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I'm drawing a VBO in GL_TRIANGLES mode, and I just draw solid triangles.

Right now I have to create a 4-component color for every single vertex. For each triangle that means 3 colors, which results in a massive amount of 12 values. But all I need is a solid color for the triangle.

Is there a way of "compressing" this amount of data so that -at least in memory- there are just 4 values stored to define the color of a triangle?

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You can call glColor* before you render your triangle. It sets the "current" vertex color, and then you don't need to bother with colors per-vertex.

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I'm using VBOs so glColor is no option, unfortunately. –  openfrog Dec 1 '11 at 12:43
    
@openfrog - Are you using OpenGL ES 1.1 or 2.0? If 1.1, I think glColor* should still be fine if you don't specify color in your vertex format. –  Jim Buck Dec 1 '11 at 20:26
    
OpenGL ES 1.1 ... –  openfrog Dec 7 '11 at 0:50
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If its an rgb color you should be able to store it as a single int

Each byte in the int represents a color argb.

You could choose to use the alpha channel or ignore it

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Would this solve the problem of having to duplicate color information 3 times per triangle? Can you give an example? –  openfrog Dec 1 '11 at 3:35
    
You would still need an int for each corner if they aren't going to be the same color. –  tam Dec 1 '11 at 4:30
    
An example would be very helpful! –  openfrog Dec 1 '11 at 12:42
    
are you using something like glcolorpointer ? for your values instead of using an int, you could use 3 bytes and get the result you are looking for, you would only handle it for every 3rd vertex. –  tam Dec 1 '11 at 14:24
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