Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to compare two time series in R to assess how closely they correlate by plotting them on a line graph. To avoid having two separate axes for the data, I want to make an index of each value, to plot the changes of the values since date X by plotting the indices rather than the raw data.

Data looks like this:

Table 1.
Month   A      B
Jan     3883   151831
Feb     3626   154070
Mar     4346   163550
Apr     3439   155674

Desired output looks like this:

Table 2.
Month   A      A.index   B        B.index
Jan     3883   100       151831   100
Feb     3626   93.38     154070   101.47
Mar     4346   111.92    163550   107.71
Apr     3439   88.56     155674   102.53

I can achieve this in excel by exporting table 1 to excel and adding a column for A.index and B.index and using a calculation to determine the change from the the index number of 100. Assuming that A is in column B, then I simply:

=(cn)/c$2*100

Where cn is column C row n, c$2 is the original value and 100 is the index number.

However, I'd like to know how to achieve the same thing in R, so that I can wrap it in a function, as this will be something I need to do semi-regularly.

Cheers Tom

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using tranform(), this is simple as can be. The key line is actually pretty similar to the Excel code, and should be self-explanatory.

df <- read.table(text="Month   A      B
Jan     3883   151831
Feb     3626   154070
Mar     4346   163550
Apr     3439   155674", header=T)

df <- transform(df, A.index=100*A/A[1], B.index=100*B/B[1])
df
#   Month    A      B   A.index  B.index
# 1   Jan 3883 151831 100.00000 100.0000
# 2   Feb 3626 154070  93.38141 101.4747
# 3   Mar 4346 163550 111.92377 107.7185
# 4   Apr 3439 155674  88.56554 102.5311
share|improve this answer
    
Works a charm. Thanks a lot. –  Tom McMahon Dec 1 '11 at 5:40

Perhaps a more scalable / general solution is to use the apply() function to iterate through all of your columns, regardless of how many columns you have:

x <- matrix(c(3883, 151831, 3626, 154070, 4346, 163550, 3439, 155674),
            ncol = 2, byrow = TRUE, dimnames = list(NULL, c("A", "B")))

apply(x, 2, function(y) 100 * y / y[1])

             A        B
[1,] 100.00000 100.0000
[2,]  93.38141 101.4747
[3,] 111.92377 107.7185
[4,]  88.56554 102.5311

You can obviously cbind() this information back to your original data if needed, or just plot this directly.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.