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This query takes 16 seconds to run

SELECT 
    WO.orderid
FROM 
    WebOrder as WO
    INNER JOIN Addresses AS A ON WO.AddressID = A.AddressID
    LEFT JOIN SalesOrders as SO on SO.SO_Number = WO.SalesOrderID   

If I comment out either of the joins, it runs in a small fraction of a second. Example:

SELECT 
    WO.orderid
FROM 
    WebOrder as WO
    INNER JOIN Addresses AS A ON WO.AddressID = A.AddressID
    -- LEFT JOIN SalesOrders as SO on SO.SO_Number = WO.SalesOrderID    

or

SELECT 
    WO.orderid
FROM 
    WebOrder as WO
    -- INNER JOIN Addresses AS A ON WO.AddressID = A.AddressID
    LEFT JOIN SalesOrders as SO on SO.SO_Number = WO.SalesOrderID

Notes

  • There exists about 40,000 records each in tables SalesOrders and Adddresses.
  • I have indexes or PKeys on all fields used in the ON clauses.

Execution Plan for the slow version (SalesOrders Join commented out)

enter image description here

Execution Plan for fast version

enter image description here



Why do these joins when used in conjunction with one another cause this to go from ~0.01 seconds to 16 seconds?

share|improve this question
2  
Have you tried index rebuild, update stats and DBCC FREEPROCCACHE? – ta.speot.is Dec 1 '11 at 5:47
    
Rebuilding the indexes in the involved tables fixed it. Please post as an answer. – Brian Webster Dec 1 '11 at 5:51
    
Glad I could help. Answer is posted, as requested. – ta.speot.is Dec 1 '11 at 6:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your execution plan doesn't show any expensive operations, I would try to following to troubleshoot bad performance:

  • Rebuild Indexes
  • Update Stats
  • DBCC FREEPROCCACHE

Personally I wouldn't expect the latter to do anything -- it looks like you have a sensible query plan as it is.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent answer. In my case, rebuilding the indexes for all tables involved did the trick. I did notice that the fragmentation value for one of the indexes was greater than 8.0. – Brian Webster Dec 1 '11 at 8:32

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