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I have been working around extracting the time series from shapes based on distances to center of mass clockwise starting from angle 0 to 360.

My Implementation that arranges contour points based on their angle to the [1,0], vector might be good for some shapes but is not useful for shapes that has much articulation. Consider the following code:

im = Image.open(os.path.join(path,filename))

im = im.filter(ifilter.MedianFilter)

contim = im.filter(ifilter.CONTOUR)

contim = contim[1:-1,1:-1] # this is because borders are extracted here as contours

contpts = np.where(contim ==0)

contpts = np.vstack((contpts[0],contpts[1])) # Just need to arrange these points clockwise with respect to the center of mass of the shape

Can anyone direct me to how I can extract that feature from any shape where I can start from a point and keep going along the contour to extract all the distances to the center of mass of the shape.

For more information about the feature, please view this paper: "LB_Keogh Supports Exact Indexing of Shapes under Rotation Invariance with Arbitrary Representations and Distance Measures"

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Please indicate more precisely what your problem is, since I have no idea about the problem you're looking at. Also, the question is not well posed. –  David Zwicker Dec 1 '11 at 10:55
    
Edited to match your request. –  JustInTime Dec 1 '11 at 14:23
    
It would be helpful if you could explain in plain language what you are trying to accomplish. What are your inputs, what are your outputs, what are the steps of the algorithm... We shouldn't need to read a paper to understand your problem. –  Charles Dec 2 '11 at 3:15
    
If I understood, there's a geometrical figure in a discretized plane, represented as a matrix. If the entry is 1, you're inside the figure. If it's 0, you're outside. He wants to determine de distance between the edge of the figure and the center of the figure for all points in the edge. He parametrized it with a polar coordinate system. The center of the figure is the origin and now he wants to get the distance to the border as a function of the angle. This is what he calls his "time series". –  Rafael S. Calsaverini Dec 24 '11 at 15:57
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If I understood, there's a geometrical figure in a discretized plane, represented as a matrix. If the entry is 1, you're inside the figure. If it's 0, you're outside. He wants to determine de distance between the edge of the figure and the center of the figure for all points in the edge. He parametrized it with a polar coordinate system. The center of the figure is the origin and now he wants to get the distance to the border as a function of the angle. This is what he calls his "time series".

Is this correct?

If yes, couldn't you just:

1. determine the center of mass,
2. reposition the origin to match the center of mass. 
3. start angle at 0
4. r = 0
5. for each angle in [0,1,...,360] 
      1. If you're in inside the figure, increase r until you reach the border. 
      2. If you're outside the figure, decrease r until you reach the border.
      3. When you reach the border, d(angle) = r

It the figure have a more or less continuous border, this will follow the contour.

Would this work?

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If I understand you right, this would not work for a shape like a human body or an animal, since there exist border points that share the same angle distance from the center of mass x axis. –  JustInTime Dec 24 '11 at 23:44
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