Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Should a function have only one return statement?

This is what I am talking about.

if (condition) {
    aVariable = 1;
    return;
}
doSomething();

if (condition) {
    aVariable = 1;
} else {
    doSomething();
}

Is one of these preferred over the other (conventions, etc)?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by DaveShaw, Joachim Pileborg, Max, Steve Fenton, chown Dec 1 '11 at 14:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Question seems to be vague. You want to know which is the better way ? –  Anuj Balan Dec 1 '11 at 11:05
1  
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Readability is most important. So early returns on begining of functions are ok, but once method starts doing something more complicated than checking its imputs/state of object, it should have only one return .

And if it is too complicated, it should be refactored to multiple functions.

share|improve this answer
3  
Used -1 because I generally would prefer a return statement over code that performs if/switch statements just to get to the end of the method. I'm of course fully in favour of refactoring once things get complicated. Also, bad input should result in exceptions, not early returns. This is not made clear enough in the answer. –  owlstead Dec 29 '11 at 16:01
    
Bad input -> exception, but sometimes there is trivial input -> trivial return (eg. 1! = 1). –  Alpedar Dec 29 '11 at 19:00
add comment

Returning early can improve readability by reducing nesting in your code.

In some languages it is best practice to have a single return statement, for example in C++ you should allocate at the top and de-allocate at the bottom of your method, but Java is not such a language so prefer readability over a single return statement.

Many people use the single return rule because they don't understand why it exists or because they have a background in managed languages.

Please Note

Before you comment about the "one true way" of writing code, please pause for a moment and consider the following.

Why must there be only a single return statement?

If you can't think of a good reason, stop arguing that it should be the case.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think the persons who developed java does't know about this :P. Because in "most"* code in java have return statement at the end. * the code i seen in JDK –  nidhin Dec 1 '11 at 11:18
    
@nidhin - the people who created Java made it possible to return anywhere, they do not enforce this "single return" rule. Try to think "why should there be a single return" and see what reason you can think of. Developers need to decide whether to use nesting or return early on a case by case basis and readability is the best measure for this. –  Steve Fenton Dec 1 '11 at 11:20
1  
Basically you shouldn't need to improve readability of your code by using early returns. If you do - your code is already a mess and early returns won't help that... much. –  Max Dec 1 '11 at 11:20
1  
@user1075261 by "single return" we mean that the method only ever exits in a single place, not necessarily using a return statement as in this question it returns when it gets to the end (or if you place an additional return statement inside the method). –  Steve Fenton Dec 1 '11 at 11:35
1  
@user1075261 - it is useful in managed languages, as you are concerned about allocation and de-allocation of memory. For this reason it was usual for methods to be carefully ordered, with the return statement last. –  Steve Fenton Dec 1 '11 at 11:39
show 6 more comments

The second is preferred since methods should have only one return statement and it must be at the end of the method itself. If you want to go deeper on that topic, there are many programs that do validations over your code. One of these is PMD. There is also a useful eclipse plugin to validate your code against the conventions you are looking for.

share|improve this answer
2  
Having that said, I sometimes disagree and use the first, when I think it's more clear to understand ;) –  loscuropresagio Dec 1 '11 at 11:10
add comment

Once you hit the return the method ends and returns to the calling method in the stack.

public void myMethod(){
if (condition) {
    aVariable = 1;
    return;
}
doSomething();
}

and

public void myMethod(){
if (condition) {
    aVariable = 1;
} else {
    doSomething();
}
}

will do the same, but AFAIK it's preferred for any method to have only one exit point (at least it's what Edsger Dijkstra says)

share|improve this answer
add comment
  1. For the best practice the return statement should be the last line of function

  2. Using else block is good method because if you want to add some other code in future the first block of code may need editing

note: All methods have it's on merits and cons. Their is no Silver bullet solution.

share|improve this answer
2  
That is a very absolute statement. A lot of the time an early return will prevent a complex and nested control-flow and would therefor be preferable over a single return. –  Mark Rotteveel Dec 1 '11 at 11:09
    
@MarkRotteveel: Not really. If you find your code structure too complex and nested while using 'last line return' style - that means you need to refactor your code. Usually that means moving validation out of business logic or similar stuff. –  Max Dec 1 '11 at 11:12
    
Eclipse actually whines if you have ”pointless” else (an if where is return clause and nothing else). –  Smar Dec 1 '11 at 11:12
3  
I agree with Mark. Sticking absolutely on rules such as "only one return in the end" or "don't jump of loops" can cause complicated code. However, the reason for "breaking" these rules must one be readability and understandability, but never laziness of the programmer. –  Heiko Schmitz Dec 1 '11 at 11:15
    
@Max if you write methods with standards that won't be complex in most cases because the number of lines in a method should be minimum. eg. JDK souce code –  nidhin Dec 1 '11 at 11:16
add comment

No, you can use both ways. First way is also used when you have many other conditions, and return will move you out from method. In this way you have no nested conditions.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Either code snippet will work. It will depend on the context in which the code is being used.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.