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I am probably just being thick but I cannot figure out what to do here....

I have a library I am trying to create that will have a virtual function that the user can use to create a custom error handler to call later in the code. One of the main hiccups I am hitting is that these errors will be stored in a collection for calling randomly.

Here's some pseudo code

class Error
{
    string Error {get; set;}
    int ErrorCode {get; set;}

    public void ErrorFunction(params obj[] arrParams);
}


class program
{
    List<Error> errorlist = new List<Error>();

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
         initList();
         errorlist[0].ErrorFunction("Sometext");         
    }

    public void initList()
    {

         Error err = new Error();
         err.ErrorFunction = MyOverloadedError;

         errorlist.add(err);
    }

    public void MyOverloadedError(params obj[] arrObjects)
    {
         Console.WriteLine(arrObjects); 
    }
}

I seem to remember being able to do this simply with a void* and a call using the addressof for assigning the function to be called.

Like I said perhaps I am being thick, I know that I have to use a delegate, but I cannot figure out how to define a delegate where it exists in an instance of the class and not as a static member of the class.

to reiterate (since I am tired and not sure if I am making this clear or just more confusing) I want to make a member function that can have a custom function assigned to it.

so basically I can do the following

Error myError = new Error();
myError.ErrorFunction = SomeCustomFunction;
...
myError.ErrorFunction("Some Parameters"); //effectively calling some static function elsewhere

Thanks in advance! my brain hurts too much....

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Not sure what you want to achieve or whether an event is more appropriate, but here's your pseude-code, fixed up to be valid, working C# code:

delegate void ErrorDelegate(params object[] arrParams);
class Error
{
    string ErrorText { get; set; }
    int ErrorCode { get; set; }

    public ErrorDelegate ErrorFunction;
}

static class Program
{
    static List<Error> errorlist = new List<Error>();

    static void initList()
    {

        Error err = new Error();
        err.ErrorFunction = MyOverloadedError;

        errorlist.Add(err);
    }


    static void MyOverloadedError(params object[] arrObjects)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(arrObjects);
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        initList();
        errorlist[0].ErrorFunction("Sometext");     
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent! This is exactly what I was trying to accomplish! I am trying to implement it into a console text based game. By doing this I can make a infrastructure that I can later use to modify the game experience dynamically (the errors in this sample are not application errors but faux errors the user will experience in game play) I think in the end I just couldn't see the forest through the trees... Thanks again! –  Jesse Knott Dec 1 '11 at 14:13
    
Well, do consider events too! Events are like a collection of delegates that can be called all at once. Well, of course, they will be executed in some arbitrary order, not in parallel, but still. We don't know what your underlying need is, so we can't suggest which is most appropriate. –  Vilx- Dec 2 '11 at 9:03

You should use an event in this case:

class Error
{
    string Error {get; set;}
    int ErrorCode {get; set;}

    public event EventHandler<ErrorOccurredEventArgs> ErrorOccurred;
}

public void initList()
{

     Error err = new Error();
     err.ErrorOccurred += MyOverloadedError;

     errorlist.add(err);
}

public void MyOverloadedError(ErrorOccurredEventArgs e)
{
     Console.WriteLine(e.Objects); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent! I was thinking that it seemed like an event should be the case, but was hoping that I could use some simple redirection of pointers to accomplish what I wanted. –  Jesse Knott Dec 1 '11 at 14:09
    
Thanks for the excellent idea though! I will have to compare the ideas you and the person below has given me, I think I was over complicating what I was trying to accomplish. –  Jesse Knott Dec 1 '11 at 14:10

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