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I have a list of type GameObject called "Within" in each of my Tiles.

List<GameObject> Within = new List<GameObject>();

GameObject has derived classes of types Bee, Flower and Tree.

I am doing a foreach that should detect all bees inside the list and select or unselect them.

foreach (Bee bee in Tile.Within)
{
    bee.selected = !bee.selected;
}

Problem is, when I do that, if the list has an object of type Flower or Tree, I get an Exception:

"Unable to cast object of type 'WindowsGame2.Flower' to type 'WindowsGame2.Bee'."

I thought that the foreach would ignore all objects that don't fit in the description when we call it, but it doesn't... How can I get it to work?

share|improve this question
    
Does your game object have a property (string) that describes the type of object ? If not, it can help to avoid having to reflect the type – Steve B Dec 1 '11 at 12:31
up vote 8 down vote accepted

What about filtering using LINQ inside the foreach?

foreach (Bee bee in Tile.Within.OfType<Bee>())
{
    bee.selected = !bee.selected;
}

That will only select the Bee's and no flowers or trees.

share|improve this answer
    
It worked, thank you :D – Kiloku Dec 1 '11 at 12:22
    
No problem. Glad to be of assistance :) – Øyvind Bråthen Dec 1 '11 at 12:25
1  
Please note, if you're making an Xbox360 game using XNA, this may generate garbage to be collected. – jv42 Dec 1 '11 at 12:27
    
@jv42 - How will this create any more garbage than your approach? Any documentation to support that? – Øyvind Bråthen Dec 1 '11 at 12:29
1  
@jv42 - Yes, it does. But in your example, you do this on each iteration of your loop: Bee bee = gameObj as Bee;. That creates a temporary object as well right? So im not saying it does not create a temporary object, I'm just saying that it isn't any different. At least not for the garbage collector. – Øyvind Bråthen Dec 1 '11 at 12:38

foreach can be modified as follows:

foreach (GameObject gameObj in Tile.Within) 
{
    Bee bee = gameObj as Bee;
    if(bee != null)
    {
        bee.selected = !bee.selected; 
    }
} 
share|improve this answer

Are you able to use LINQ in your project?

foreach (Bee bee in Tile.Within.Where(o=>o is Bee))
{
    bee.selected = !bee.selected;
}
share|improve this answer
    
ehh, too slow, dammit :) – Marc Dec 1 '11 at 12:23

foreach doesn't work that way. It will just 'cast' the object to the requested type.

So you need to either filter beforehand (which might create garbage, if you're on Xbox360, this might be an issue), or filter in your loop.

There are several ways to do that, revolving around the use of either as or is or both. For instance:

foreach (GameObject gameObj in Tile.Within) 
{
    if (gameObj is Bee)
    {
        Bee bee = (Bee)gameObj;
        bee.selected = !bee.selected; 
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
1  
!bee.selected; --> bee undeclared identifier. – Azodious Dec 1 '11 at 12:29
    
@Azodious fixed thanks. – jv42 Dec 1 '11 at 12:31
    
if (x is Bee) ... should be followed by Bee bee = (Bee)gameObj;, but you will save a runtime type check if you do Bee bee = gameObj as Bee; if (bee != null) ... – phoog Dec 1 '11 at 21:39
    
@phoog Fixed. The alternative is in another post. – jv42 Dec 2 '11 at 8:51

On each iteration you should check the type of the current item. If it is a Bee cast the result and do your work.

foreach (var item in Tile.Within)
{
    if (item is Bee)
    {
        ((Bee)item).Selected = !((Bee)item).Selected;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Azodious' answer is better, as there is less cast. Here is why : msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182271.aspx – Steve B Dec 1 '11 at 12:36
    
You're right but now I know the OfType<T> things changed for me ;) – JiBéDoublevé Dec 1 '11 at 12:45

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