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I have a problem relating to template functions and threads:

template <class TYPE_size>
void Threader(TYPE_size counter)
{
    counter++;
}
int main()
{
    unsigned int counter = 100;
    thread one(Threader,counter);
    one.join();    
    cout << counter;
}

This does not compile I get:

error: no matching function for call to âstd::thread::thread(, unsigned int&)â

If I remove the template it compiles and if I change the function call to a standard function call rather than a thread (still using the template) its compiles.

Does anyone know why this is?

Thanks

I'm using Centos5 64 bit.

 error: no matching function for call to âstd::thread::thread(<unresolved overloaded function type>, unsigned int&)â
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux6E/4.4.0/../../../../include/c++/4.4.0/thread:124: note: candidates are: std::thread::thread(std::thread&&)
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux6E/4.4.0/../../../../include/c++/4.4.0/thread:122: note:                 std::thread::thread(const std::thread&)
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux6E/4.4.0/../../../../include/c++/4.4.0/thread:121: note:                 std::thread::thread()
share|improve this question
    
I don't remember the parameters, types, etc, but maybe thread one(Threader<counter>,counter) ? –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 1 '11 at 14:25
    
According to the error, there is no thread constructor that expects a function. Default, copy, and move is it. –  Mark B Dec 1 '11 at 14:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no function named Threader. When you write Threader<int> or something, then the compiler creates a function. If you then write Threader<float>, then the compiler creates a new function. You can either provide a default template parameter, or give it a parameter when you call it.

template <class TYPE_size=int>

or

thread one(Threader<int>, counter);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help, that sorts it out. But why does it work when I call threader as a non thread function call. I.E. Threader(counter);. –  Columbo Dec 1 '11 at 14:47
    
Because the compiler infers the template parameter type from your function parameter type. It knows what type counter is, and then thinks "oh, you meant to write Threader<int>(counter)". More or less. –  Colin Dec 1 '11 at 14:48
    
Thanks. I think I see now, so when called as a thread Threader cannot determine the type from the argument 'counter' even though it is passed as well. Is this because when Threader is called as a thread (a thread called 'one' in this case) it is passed along with its arguments as separate entities and the compiler is for some reason unable to work out that 'counter' is the argument to 'Threader' at the time of thread creation? –  Columbo Dec 1 '11 at 14:58
    
Well for one, it has nothing to do with whether Threader is being called from a thread or not. In your case, counter is not an argument to the 'Threader' function, it is an argument to the 'one' function, so yes: the compiler doesn't know what function Threader actually is, or its type. –  Colin Dec 1 '11 at 17:25
    
Thanks Colin, much appreciated. –  Columbo Dec 2 '11 at 11:21

Your missing the argument list of your template.

Try:

 unsigned int counter = 100;
 thread one(Threader<unsigned int>,counter);

or, if you are using c++x0/c++11 standard, give your template a standard type like:

template <typename TYPE_size = unsigned int>
void Threader(TYPE_size counter)
{
    counter++;
}
int main()
{
    unsigned int counter = 100;
    thread one(Threader<>,counter);
    one.join();    
    cout << counter;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The default argument doesn't help; Threader is always a template, not a function. –  Kerrek SB Dec 1 '11 at 14:47
    
of course will the argument list still be necessary the call should look like this with a standard type: thread one(Threader<>,counter); or as simple function call: Threader<>(counter); –  Michael Haidl Dec 1 '11 at 14:51
    
Can you test the first version? I can't make it work. –  Kerrek SB Dec 1 '11 at 14:51
    
The first version does work with c++0x/c++11 standard. I edit my answer to make it clearer. –  Michael Haidl Dec 1 '11 at 15:04
    
How strange, my GCC 4.6.2 rejects it. But function-template default-arguments are new in C++11, so it's possible that it isn't universally implemented yet. Cheers. –  Kerrek SB Dec 1 '11 at 15:08

I'm taking the liberty of offering a variety of fixes to achieve what I believe is intended behaviour:

#include <thread>

template <typename T>
void Threader(T & counter)    // take by reference!
{
   counter++;
}

int main()
{
   unsigned int counter = 100;
   std::thread one(Threader<unsigned int>,   // specify template *instance*
                   std::ref(counter) );      // pass variable as reference
   one.join();
   return counter;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a note that in the original example counter won't change. –  bartolo-otrit Jun 25 '14 at 17:30

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