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I know the following code will move an object in a straight line. How can I get the object to travel in a wavy line? I know that something extra is required for the x variable.

public void draw(Graphics2D g) 
        {
            g.setColor(Color.WHITE);
            g.fillOval ((int) (x - r), (int) (y - r), (int)
                    (2 * r),
                    (int) (2 * r));

            y++;


            if (y - r > height)
                y = -r;
        }
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1  
Look into sin and cos. –  Polynomial Dec 1 '11 at 14:28
    
Could you upload a picture of how you want it to move? –  user1071777 Dec 1 '11 at 14:33
    
Here is an URL which shows the pattern: rookery.s3.amazonaws.com/1772500/1772658_76cb_625x625.jpg –  AWb Dec 1 '11 at 14:34
    
Sine or cosine should produce that pattern. –  user1071777 Dec 1 '11 at 14:45
    
I have used y++; x-=Math.sin(Math.toRadians(50)); but this simply changes the object direction while its moving. A consist left to right movement is what I am after. –  AWb Dec 1 '11 at 14:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use the sine or cosine function to calculate y as a function of x.

Multiply the sine or cosine function to increase the amplitude (how high it goes)

y = 100 * sin(x) // will make it have peaks of -100 and 100

Divide the x to increase the period. (distance between peaks)

y = sin(x/2) // will make it take twice the x distance between peaks.

Something like this:

public void draw(Graphics2D g) 
    {
        g.setColor(Color.WHITE);
        g.fillOval ((int) (x - r), (int) (y - r), (int)
                (2 * r),
                (int) (2 * r));

        x++; // Left to right movement
        // Example, modify the multipliers as necessary
        y = 100 * Math.sin(Math.toDegrees(x/4))
    }
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Many thanks, much appreciated! My solution was y++ (object dropping downwards), and x += 10*Math.sin(y/5); –  AWb Dec 1 '11 at 15:07

Including a sin(x) or cos(x) in your function will provide a regular wave pattern, irregular pattern needs a more sophisticated function

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Hi, Can you advise how to apply this into the code? I have already attempted to use Math.sin(x) and Math.cos(x) but a steady wavy line is not showing on screen. –  AWb Dec 1 '11 at 14:31
    
so you want the line to be wavy but irregularly wavy? Then I would add a Random variable that inflicts the amplitude of the wave. –  AndroidHustle Dec 1 '11 at 14:36
    
It does not matter how wavy the object movement is. I want to be able to see the object change directions (from left to right) in a wavy pattern. –  AWb Dec 1 '11 at 14:39
    
I'm not sure where the motion is taking place in your code. Never worked with animations in java. But if you integrate a sine function where x is a variable that loops a value from -pi to pi you will have a wave as the product of that when plotted. Be aware that the product from a sine or cosine function always is between -1 and 1 so you may have to multiply it to actually show it as a wavy movement in your animation, i.e. -1 and 1 may be too small of a value to actually make a visible impact of the movement –  AndroidHustle Dec 1 '11 at 14:50

I know you already accepted an answer, but here's something to draw additional inspiration from that I whipped up...

package wavy;

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.Graphics2D;
import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

public class Wavy {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        final JFrame frame = new JFrame("Wavy!");

        final WavyPanel wp = new WavyPanel();

        frame.getContentPane().add(wp, BorderLayout.CENTER);

        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

        final Ticker t = new Ticker(wp);
        final Repainter r = new Repainter(wp);

        frame.pack();
        frame.setVisible(true);

        final Timer tickTimer = new Timer();
        final Timer paintTimer = new Timer();

        paintTimer.schedule(r, 1000, 50);
        tickTimer.schedule(t, 1000, 10);

    }

    private static class WavyPanel extends JPanel {

        private final Dimension size = new Dimension(640, 480);
        private int amplitude = 50;
        private int frequency = 5;

        private int x = 0;
        private double y = size.height / 2;
        private int yBase = 0;

        WavyPanel() {

            super(true);

        }

        @Override
        protected void paintComponent(final Graphics g) {

            final Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D)g;

            g2.setColor(Color.WHITE);
            g2.fillRect(0, 0, size.width, size.height);

            g2.setColor(Color.BLACK);
            g2.fillOval(x, (int)y, 30, 30);

        }

        @Override
        public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
            return size;
        }

        @Override
        public Dimension getMinimumSize() {
            return size;
        }

        @Override
        public Dimension getMaximumSize() {
            return size;
        }

        public void tick() {

            //Move a pixel to the right; loop over to the left when reaching edge
            x = (++x) % size.width;

            //Length of one full wave = panel width divided by frequency
            final int waveLength = size.width / frequency;

            //Incrementing yBase; capping off at wavelength
            yBase = (++yBase) % waveLength;

            //Normalizing to [0..1]
            final double normalized = (double)yBase / (double)waveLength;

            //Full wave at 2*pi, means...
            final double radians = normalized * Math.PI * 2;

            //Getting the sine
            final double sine = Math.sin(radians);

            //Multiplying with amplitude, add to center position and we have our y
            y = (int)(sine * amplitude) + size.height/2;

        }

    }

    private static class Ticker extends TimerTask {

        private final WavyPanel panel;

        Ticker(final WavyPanel panel) {

            this.panel = panel;

        }

        @Override
        public void run() {

            panel.tick();

        }

    }

    private static class Repainter extends TimerTask {

        private final WavyPanel panel;

        Repainter(final WavyPanel panel) {

            this.panel = panel;

        }

        @Override
        public void run() {

            panel.repaint();

        }

    }

}

This should run at an approximate 20 frames per second. You can increase this by setting the second argument of paintTimer.schedule(r, 1000, 50) lower. The speed of movement can be altered by lowering (speeding up) or increasing (slower) the second argument of tickTimer.schedule(t, 1000, 50).

Changing the amplitude field of WavyPanel will change how high/low the circle moves. Changing the frequency to a higher value will result in shorter waves, while a lower value will produce longer waves.

With some additional work you could add in controls to change the amplitude and frequency on-the-fly. Some additional notes:

  • You may wish to add some safeguard to the tick() method to make sure that when one invocation is already running, additional ones are skipped until the first one is done. Otherwise the calculations could fail for short tick intervals. A semaphore could be used here.
  • Since trigonometric calculations aren't exactly the cheapest, you may consider caching some results (e.g. in an array) for re-use if many similar animations are to be played or if there's a lot more drawing going on.
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I hope I'm interpreting this right. Could use the sine or cosine of either your x or y coordinate. I'm not at a machine with java so I can't make an example at the moment..

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How would you apply a sine or cosine function into this code? Adding something like x-=Math.sin(Math.toRadians(50)); only changes direction of the object one way. One want a consist movement from left and right. Any suggestions are appreciated. –  AWb Dec 1 '11 at 14:44
1  
If you want it to go left to right, you need to increment your x variable. –  user1071777 Dec 1 '11 at 14:54
    
Check user1071777's answer! Sorry for being brief –  TFennis Dec 1 '11 at 14:59

You're right that you need to update both the x and y variables to get a wavy line. Here's the general strategy for a horizontal line that is wavy up and down:

  1. Choose a function f(x) that has the shape you want. This will be used to calculate values for y. (For instance, you can use y = amplitude * Math.sin(frequency * x) to get a regular sine wave of a given amplitude and frequency.)
  2. If necessary, write the code that implements your function.
  3. Set x to some initial value.
  4. In draw, before you paint the oval, calculate y = f(x);. Paint the oval and then increment x. If necessary, reset x so it stays in range.

If you want a vertical line that is wavy left and right, just reverse the roles of x and y in the above. If you want the oval to go in the reverse direction, just decrement instead of increment in step 4.

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