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How can I write two functions that would take a string and return if it starts with the specified character/string or ends with it?

For example:

$str = '|apples}';

echo startsWith($str, '|'); //Returns true
echo endsWith($str, '}'); //Returns true
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21 Answers

up vote 301 down vote accepted
function startsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    return $needle === "" || strpos($haystack, $needle) === 0;
}
function endsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    return $needle === "" || substr($haystack, -strlen($needle)) === $needle;
}

var_dump(startsWith("hello world", "hello")); // true
var_dump(endsWith("hello world", "world"));   // true

UPDATE: Java and .NET implementations of String.StartsWith and String.EndsWith return true if needle is an empty string. Answer revised accordingly.

UPDATE: MrHus's startsWith function is faster for large haystack.

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16  
I wonder why the other solution is more popular, this one is shorter –  user1125394 Jun 29 '12 at 13:16
4  
This answer isn't near top, so lazy people don't get this far down. IMHO, best answer. Simple, fast, and works for more than just a letter. –  Chris K Feb 21 '13 at 20:46
4  
Succinct solution but keep in mind it's case-sensitive. –  aleemb Apr 6 '13 at 15:51
2  
endsWith() gives false when $needle is empty string (and $haystach is not), should return true I think –  Stefaan Apr 30 '13 at 9:25
4  
You're going to search the whole string, just to see if it begins with the required substring? Ick! Sorry, but MrHus's solution got my vote. –  David Wallace Oct 14 '13 at 2:25
show 5 more comments
function startsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
     $length = strlen($needle);
     return (substr($haystack, 0, $length) === $needle);
}

function endsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    $length = strlen($needle);
    if ($length == 0) {
        return true;
    }

    return (substr($haystack, -$length) === $needle);
}

Use this if you don't want to use a regex.

share|improve this answer
4  
+1 This is cleaner than the accepted answer. Also, $length is not needed in the last line of the endsWith(). –  too much php Sep 17 '09 at 2:57
4  
Just FYI, the $length parameter in endsWith() is redundant, since substr() will terminate at the end of the string anyway. –  AgentConundrum Feb 7 '11 at 18:11
12  
-1 endsWith('foo','') returns false, should be true. –  postfuturist May 27 '11 at 21:04
3  
I'd say endsWith('foo', '') == false is the correct behavior. Because foo doesn't end with nothing. 'Foo' ends with 'o', 'oo' and 'Foo'. –  MrHus Apr 13 '12 at 13:34
27  
EndsWith can be written a lot shorter: return substr($haystack, -strlen($needle))===$needle; –  Rok Kralj Jun 11 '12 at 9:57
show 9 more comments
function startswith1($haystack, $needle) {
    return substr($haystack, 0, strlen($needle)) === $needle;
}

function startswith2($haystack, $needle) {
    return preg_match('/^'.preg_quote($needle,'/').'/', $haystack) > 0;
}

function startswith3($haystack, $needle) {
    return substr_compare($haystack, $needle, 0, strlen($needle)) === 0;
}

function startswith4($haystack, $needle) {
    return strpos($haystack, $needle) === 0;
}

function startswith5($haystack, $needle) {
    return strncmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) === 0;
}

Test Case

function randstr($len=8, $chars='ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789') {
    $str = '';
    $randmax = strlen($chars)-1;

    for(;$len--;) {
        $str .= $chars[mt_rand(0,$randmax)];
    }

    return $str;
}


echo 'generating tests';
for($i=0; $i<100000; ++$i) {
    if($i%1000===0) echo '.';
    $test_cases[] = array(
        'haystack' => randstr(mt_rand(1,7000)),
        'needle' => randstr(mt_rand(1,3000)),
    );
}
echo "done!\n";

$start = microtime(true);
foreach($test_cases as $tc) {
    startswith1($tc['haystack'],$tc['needle']);
}
echo 'startswith1: '.(microtime(true)-$start).' seconds'.PHP_EOL;

$start = microtime(true);
foreach($test_cases as $tc) {
    startswith2($tc['haystack'],$tc['needle']);
}
echo 'startswith2: '.(microtime(true)-$start).' seconds'.PHP_EOL;

$start = microtime(true);
foreach($test_cases as $tc) {
    startswith3($tc['haystack'],$tc['needle']);
}
echo 'startswith3: '.(microtime(true)-$start).' seconds'.PHP_EOL;

$start = microtime(true);
foreach($test_cases as $tc) {
    startswith4($tc['haystack'],$tc['needle']);
}
echo 'startswith4: '.(microtime(true)-$start).' seconds'.PHP_EOL;

$start = microtime(true);
foreach($test_cases as $tc) {
    startswith5($tc['haystack'],$tc['needle']);
}
echo 'startswith5: '.(microtime(true)-$start).' seconds'.PHP_EOL;

Results

startswith1: 0.26411914825439 seconds
startswith2: 5.5287990570068 seconds
startswith3: 0.29700589179993 seconds
startswith4: 0.3069760799408 seconds
startswith5: 0.29142212867737 seconds
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1  
If the strings are not empty, as in your tests, this is actually somehow (20-30%) faster: function startswith5b($haystack, $needle) {return ($haystack{0}==$needle{0})?strncmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) === 0:FALSE;} I added a reply below. –  FrancescoMM Jul 28 '13 at 15:38
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All answers so far seem to do loads of unnecessary work, strlen calculations, string allocations (substr), etc. The 'strpos' and 'stripos' functions return the index of the first occurrence of $needle in $haystack:

function startsWith($haystack,$needle,$case=true)
{
    if ($case)
        return strpos($haystack, $needle, 0) === 0;

    return stripos($haystack, $needle, 0) === 0;
}

function endsWith($haystack,$needle,$case=true)
{
    $expectedPosition = strlen($haystack) - strlen($needle);

    if ($case)
        return strrpos($haystack, $needle, 0) === $expectedPosition;

    return strripos($haystack, $needle, 0) === $expectedPosition;
}
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2  
endsWith() function has an error. Its first line should be (without the -1): $expectedPosition = strlen($haystack) - strlen($needle); –  Enrico Detoma Aug 5 '10 at 17:16
4  
The strlen() thing is not unnecessary. In case the string doesn't start with the given needle then ur code will unnecessarily scan the whole haystack. –  AppleGrew Jan 4 '11 at 15:46
5  
@Mark yea, checking just the beginning is a LOT faster, especially if you're doing something like checking MIME types (or any other place where the string is bound to be large) –  chacham15 Sep 26 '11 at 15:39
2  
@mark I did some benchmarks with 1000 char haystack and 10 or 800 char needle and strpos was 30% faster. Do your benchmarks before stating that something is faster or not... –  wdev Aug 6 '12 at 0:39
3  
You should strongly consider quoting the needle like strpos($haystack, "$needle", 0) if there's any chance it's not already a string (e.g., if it's coming from json_decode()). Otherwise, the [odd] default behavior of strpos() may cause unexpected results: "If needle is not a string, it is converted to an integer and applied as the ordinal value of a character." –  user113215 Dec 3 '12 at 3:47
show 7 more comments
function startsWith($haystack, $needle, $case = true) {
    if ($case) {
        return (strcmp(substr($haystack, 0, strlen($needle)), $needle) === 0);
    }
    return (strcasecmp(substr($haystack, 0, strlen($needle)), $needle) === 0);
}

function endsWith($haystack, $needle, $case = true) {
    if ($case) {
        return (strcmp(substr($haystack, strlen($haystack) - strlen($needle)), $needle) === 0);
    }
    return (strcasecmp(substr($haystack, strlen($haystack) - strlen($needle)), $needle) === 0);
}

Credit To:

Check if a string ends with another string

Check if a string begins with another string

share|improve this answer
    
strtolower is not the best way to make case insensitive functions. In some locales casing is more complex than just upper and lower. –  Sander Rijken May 13 '09 at 21:25
6  
I see complaining and no solution... If you're gonna say it's bad, then you should give an example of how it should be as well. –  KdgDev May 14 '09 at 11:06
2  
@WebDevHobo: that's why I added an answer myself a day before your comment. For your code strcasecmp was indeed the right thing to do. –  Sander Rijken Aug 6 '10 at 7:34
    
@Click_Upvote you should buy WebDev a beer :v –  almosnow Apr 28 '11 at 16:20
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The regex functions above, but with the other tweaks also suggested above:

 function startsWith($needle, $haystack) {
     return preg_match('/^' . preg_quote($needle, '/') . '/', $haystack);
 }

 function endsWith($needle, $haystack) {
     return preg_match('/' . preg_quote($needle, '/') . '$/', $haystack);
 }
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4  
you need to do preg_quote($needle,'/') otherwise the quoting is moot ;) also $ will match a \n without the D modifier –  Mark Jul 28 '11 at 18:57
1  
@Mark: I've added it, thanks! –  Krinkle Nov 16 '12 at 15:11
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If speed is important for you, try this.(I believe it is the fastest method)

Works only for strings and if $haystack is only 1 character

function startsWithChar($needle, $haystack)
{
   return ($needle[0] === $haystack);
}

function endsWithChar($needle, $haystack)
{
   return ($needle[strlen($needle) - 1] === $haystack);
}

$str='|apples}';
echo startsWithChar($str,'|'); //Returns true
echo endsWithChar($str,'}'); //Returns true
echo startsWithChar($str,'='); //Returns false
echo endsWithChar($str,'#'); //Returns false
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1  
@bažmegakapa comparing one char is indeed faster by logic than comparing strings, it is rather obvious, and has the obvious limit of being limited to one char. If you doubt it you may test it yourself. Anyway I have added first char check before the methods of the other answers and obtained a 30%-40% speedup, so it does help –  FrancescoMM Jul 28 '13 at 13:47
    
this is probably the most efficient answer because not using any function as extra, just usual string... –  user1646111 Aug 1 '13 at 10:29
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I realize this has been finished, but you may want to look at strncmp as it allows you to put the length of the string to compare against, so:

function startsWith($haystack, $needle, $case=true) {
    if ($case)
        return strncasecmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) == 0;
    else
        return strncmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) == 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
how would you do endswith with this? –  Mark Aug 26 '11 at 15:20
    
@Mark - you can look at the accepted answer, but I prefer to use strncmp mainly because I think it is safer. –  James Black Aug 26 '11 at 16:45
    
I mean with strncmp specifically. You can't specify an offset. That would mean your endsWith function would have to use a different method entirely. –  Mark Aug 26 '11 at 18:50
    
@Mark - For endsWith I would just use strrpos (php.net/manual/en/function.strrpos.php), but, generally, anytime you go to use strcmp strncmp is probably a safer option. –  James Black Aug 27 '11 at 0:15
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in short:

function startsWith($str, $needle){
   return substr($str, 0, strlen($needle)) === $needle;
}

function endsWith($str, $needle){
   $length = strlen($needle);
   return !$length || substr($str, - $length) === $needle;
}
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Short and easy-to-understand one-liners without regular expressions.

startsWith() is straight forward.

function startsWith($haystack, $needle) {
   return (strpos($haystack, $needle) === 0);
}

endsWith() uses the slightly fancy and slow strrev():

function endsWith($haystack, $needle) {
   return (strpos(strrev($haystack), strrev($needle)) === 0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
little bit old question –  genesis Jun 28 '11 at 22:46
    
strpos is not the "right tool".. (and neither strrev) –  FrancescoMM Jul 28 '13 at 14:19
    
+1 for most funny solution –  Tino Feb 20 at 21:39
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I hope that the below answer may be efficient and also simple:

$content = "The main string to search";
$search = "T";
//For compare the begining string with case insensitive. 
if(stripos($content, $search) === 0) echo 'Yes';
else echo 'No';

//For compare the begining string with case sensitive. 
if(strpos($content, $search) === 0) echo 'Yes';
else echo 'No';

//For compare the ending string with case insensitive. 
if(stripos(strrev($content), strrev($search)) === 0) echo 'Yes';
else echo 'No';

//For compare the ending string with case sensitive. 
if(strpos(strrev($content), strrev($search)) === 0) echo 'Yes';
else echo 'No';
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You also can use regular expressions:

function endsWith($haystack, $needle, $case=true) {
  return preg_match("/.*{$needle}$/" . (($case) ? "" : "i"), $haystack);
}
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2  
$needle should be escaped with preg_quote($needle, '/'). –  Krinkle Nov 16 '12 at 15:10
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The substr function can return false in many special cases, so here is my version, which deals with these issues:

function startsWith( $haystack, $needle ){
  return $needle === ''.substr( $haystack, 0, strlen( $needle )); // substr's false => empty string
}

function endsWith( $haystack, $needle ){
  $len = strlen( $needle );
  return $needle === ''.substr( $haystack, -$len, $len ); // ! len=0
}

Tests (true means good):

var_dump( startsWith('',''));
var_dump( startsWith('1',''));
var_dump(!startsWith('','1'));
var_dump( startsWith('1','1'));
var_dump( startsWith('1234','12'));
var_dump(!startsWith('1234','34'));
var_dump(!startsWith('12','1234'));
var_dump(!startsWith('34','1234'));
var_dump('---');
var_dump( endsWith('',''));
var_dump( endsWith('1',''));
var_dump(!endsWith('','1'));
var_dump( endsWith('1','1'));
var_dump(!endsWith('1234','12'));
var_dump( endsWith('1234','34'));
var_dump(!endsWith('12','1234'));
var_dump(!endsWith('34','1234'));

Also, the substr_compare function also worth looking. http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.substr-compare.php

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This may work

function startsWith($haystack, $needle) {
     return substr($haystack, 0, strlen($needle)) == $needle;
}

Source: http://stackoverflow.com/a/4419658

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Focusing on startswith, if you are sure strings are not empty, adding a test on the first char, before the comparison, the strlen, etc., speeds things up a bit:

function startswith5b($haystack, $needle) {
    return ($haystack{0}==$needle{0})?strncmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) === 0:FALSE;
}

It is somehow (20%-30%) faster. Adding another char test, like $haystack{1}===$needle{1} does not seem to speedup things much, may even slow down.

=== seems faster than == Conditional operator (a)?b:c seems faster than if(a) b; else c;


For those asking "why not use strpos?" calling other solutions "unnecessary work"


strpos is fast, but it is not the right tool for this job.

To understand, here is a little simulation as an example:

Search a12345678c inside bcdefga12345678xbbbbb.....bbbbba12345678c

What the computer does "inside"?

    With strccmp, etc...

    is a===b? NO
    return false



    With strpos

    is a===b? NO -- iterating in haysack
    is a===c? NO
    is a===d? NO
    ....
    is a===g? NO
    is a===g? NO
    is a===a? YES
    is 1===1? YES -- iterating in needle
    is 2===3? YES
    is 4===4? YES
    ....
    is 8===8? YES
    is c===x? NO: oh God,
    is a===1? NO -- iterating in haysack again
    is a===2? NO
    is a===3? NO
    is a===4? NO
    ....
    is a===x? NO
    is a===b? NO
    is a===b? NO
    is a===b? NO
    is a===b? NO
    is a===b? NO
    is a===b? NO
    is a===b? NO
    ...
    ... may many times...
    ...
    is a===b? NO
    is a===a? YES -- iterating in needle again
    is 1===1? YES
    is 2===3? YES
    is 4===4? YES
    is 8===8? YES
    is c===c? YES YES YES I have found the same string! yay!
    was it at position 0? NOPE
    What you mean NO? So the string I found is useless? YEs.
    Damn.
    return false

Assuming strlen does not iterate the whole string (but even in that case) this is not convenient at all.

share|improve this answer
    
There's only a speed up if the first characters are different. –  Jack Aug 2 '13 at 7:51
    
@Jack yes, of course, the idea is that statistically that happens, so the speedup is generrally a 20%-30% over the whole test set (including cases where it is not different). You gain a lot when they are different and loose very little when they are not. In the average you gain that 30% (varies depending on set, but mostly you gain speed on large tests) –  FrancescoMM Sep 18 '13 at 8:42
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Here are two functions that don't introduce a temporary string, which could be useful when needles are substantially big:

function startsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    return strncmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) === 0;
}

function endsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    return $needle === '' || substr_compare($haystack, $needle, -strlen($needle)) === 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Works since PHP5.1 and IMHO best answer. But endsWidth should do return $needle==='' || substr_compare(... so it works as expected for -strlen($needle)===0 which, without the fix, makes endsWith('a','') return false –  Tino Feb 20 at 21:53
    
@Tino Thanks ... I feel that's a bug in substr_compare() actually, so I've added a PR to fix that :) –  Jack Feb 21 at 2:55
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Why not the following?

//How to check if a string begins with another string
$haystack = "valuehaystack";
$needle = "value";
if (strpos($haystack, $needle) === 0){
    echo "Found " . $needle . " at the beginning of " . $haystack . "!";
}

Output:

Found value at the beginning of valuehaystack!

Keep in mind, strpos will return false if the needle was not found in the haystack, and will return 0 if, and only if, needle was found at index 0 (AKA the beginning).

And here's endsWith:

$haystack = "valuehaystack";
$needle = "haystack";

//If index of the needle plus the length of the needle is the same length as the entire haystack.
if (strpos($haystack, $needle) + strlen($needle) === strlen($haystack)){
    echo "Found " . $needle . " at the end of " . $haystack . "!";
}

In this scenario there is no need for a function startsWith() as

(strpos($stringToSearch, $doesItStartWithThis) === 0)

will return true or false accurately.

It seems odd it's this simple with all the wild functions running rampant here.

share|improve this answer
    
Seems odd that if you are searching for "xy" inside string "abcdefghijklmxyz" instead of just comparing "x" to "a" and returning FALSE, you look every character from "a" to "m" then end up finding "xy" inside the string, and at last you return FALSE because the position of it is not zero! This is what you are doing, and it is odd and wilder than any other rampant function here. –  FrancescoMM Jan 23 at 15:05
    
The simplicity is in the typing, not the logic. –  Kade Hafen Jan 23 at 17:34
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Based on James Black's answer, here is its endsWith version:

function startsWith($haystack, $needle, $case=true) {
    if ($case)
        return strncmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) == 0;
    else
        return strncasecmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) == 0;
}

function endsWith($haystack, $needle, $case=true) {
     return startsWith(strrev($haystack),strrev($needle),$case);

}

Note: I have swapped the if-else part for James Black's startsWith function, because strncasecmp is actually the case-insensitive version of strncmp.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for most creative endsWith solution –  Tino Feb 20 at 21:43
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Here’s an efficient solution for PHP 4. You could get faster results if on PHP 5 by using substr_compare instead of strcasecmp(substr(...)).

function stringBeginsWith($haystack, $beginning, $caseInsensitivity = false)
{
    if ($caseInsensitivity)
        return strncasecmp($haystack, $beginning, strlen($beginning)) == 0;
    else
        return strncmp($haystack, $beginning, strlen($beginning)) == 0;
}

function stringEndsWith($haystack, $ending, $caseInsensitivity = false)
{
    if ($caseInsensitivity)
        return strcasecmp(substr($haystack, strlen($haystack) - strlen($ending)), $haystack) == 0;
    else
        return strpos($haystack, $ending, strlen($haystack) - strlen($ending)) !== false;
}
share|improve this answer
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Many of the previous answers will work just as well. However, this is possibly as short as you can make it and have it do what you desire.

function startsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    return $needle ? strpos($haystack, $needle) === 0 : "";
}

function endsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    return $needle ? substr($haystack, -strlen($needle)) === $needle : "";
}
share|improve this answer
1  
does not work with $needle==='0' –  Tino Feb 20 at 21:31
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function startsWith($haystack, $needle){    
   $l = strlen($needle);
   for($i =0 ;$i<$l;$i++)
        if($needle[$i]!=$haystack[$i])
              return false;
    return true;
}

I think this kind of solution should be the fastest. (I don't took time handling empty $haystack and/or empty $needle, as writing endsWith function neither. Its your challenge!)


This is the regexp that I was looking for:

$starts_with = preg_match('/^$neddle_letters/',$haystack)?"yes":"no";

where

  • /-s means that string is a regexp
  • ^ means starts with
  • preg_match returns array ( 0 => $neddle) if found(, where 0 means first match, not 0.position)
  • and empty array if not
  • $neddle_letters should not contain special characters - like: $|^()[]<>{}+-\:*=?!. - only if they are escaped
  • you can play with it here
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think it is can be fast, as strlen() is too slow. –  Tino Feb 20 at 21:35
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protected by DaveRandom Feb 28 '13 at 12:17

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