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When I declare a base class, should I declare all the functions in it as virtual, or should I have a set of virtual functions and a set of non-virtual functions which I am sure are not going to be inherited?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A function only needs to be virtual iff a derived class will implement that function in a different way.

For example:

class Base {
public:
  void setI (int i)  // No need for it to be virtual
  {
    m_i = i;
  }

  virtual ~Base () {}         // Almost always a good idea

  virtual bool isDerived1 ()  // Is overridden - so make it virtual
  {
    return false;
  }

private:
  int m_i;
};

class Derived1 : public Base {
public:
  virtual ~Derived () {}

  virtual bool isDerived1 ()  // Is overridden - so make it virtual
  {
    return true;
  }
};

As a result, I would error the side of not having anything virtual unless you know in advance that you intend to override it or until you discover that you require the behaviour. The only exception to this is the destructor, for which its almost always the case that you want it to be virtual in a base class.

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When at least one method is virtual in a class you should have virtual destructor. –  stefanB May 7 '09 at 13:05

You should only make functions you intend and design to be overridden virtual. Making a method virtual is not free in terms of both maintenance and performance (maintenance being the much bigger issue IMHO).

Once a method is virtual it becomes harder to reason about any code which uses this method. Because instead of considering what one method call would do, you must consider what N method calls would do in that scenario. N represents the number of sub classes which override that method.

The one exception to this rule is destructors. They should be virtual in any class which is intended to be derived from. It's the only way to guarantee that the proper destructor is called during deallocation.

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The non-virtual interface idiom (C++ Coding Standards item 39) says that a base class should have non-virtual interface methods, allowing the base class to guarantee invariants, and non-public virtual methods for customization of the base class behaviour by derived classes. The non-virtual interface methods call the virtual methods to provide the overridable behaviour.

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I tend to make only the things I want to be overridable virtual. If my initial assumptions about what I will want to override turn out to be wrong, I go back and change the base class.

Oh, and obviously always make your destructor virtual if you're working on something that will be inherited from.

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The interface functions should be, in general, virtual. Functions that provide fixed functionality should not.

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Why declare something virtual until you are really overriding it? I believe it's not a question of being sure or not. Follow the facts: is it overriden somewhere? No? Then it must not be virtual.

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This results in a situation where if you want to change one subclass (to override a method previously not overridden), then you must change the base class (to make the method virtual), which means you must recompile all code which references the base class. In some projects base class fragility is not a problem, but in others it is. It depends on your build process, and on whether you have published the base class's interface. –  Steve Jessop May 7 '09 at 13:24
    
So IMO methods should be virtual iff subclasses are permitted to override them (and runtime polymorphism is supported), not iff they actually do. –  Steve Jessop May 7 '09 at 13:26

If you are creating a base class ( you are sure that somebody derives the class ) then you can do following things:

  • Make destructor virtual (a must for base class)
  • Define methods which should be derived and make them virtual.
  • Define methods which need not be ( or should not be) derived as non-virtual.
  • If the functions are only for derived class and not for base class then mark them as protected.
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Compiler wouldn't know which actual piece of code will be run when pointer of base type calls a virtual function. so the actual piece of code that would be run needs to be evaluated at run-time according to which object is pointed by base class pointer. So avoid the use of virtual function if the function is not gonne be overriden in an inherited class.

TLDR version: "you should have a set of virtual functions and a set of non-virtual functions which you are sure are not going to be inherited." Because virtual functions causes a performance decrease at run-time.

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