Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have following markup extension defined in Utils.dll

[assembly: XmlnsDefinition("http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation", "Whatever")]
namespace Whatever
{
    public class GetString : MarkupExtension
    {
        public static ResourceManager ResourceManager { get; set; }
        public string Key { get; set; }

        public GetString(string key)
        {
            Key = key;
        }

        public override object ProvideValue(IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
        {
            if (ResourceManager == null) 
                throw new InvalidOperationException();
            return ResourceManager.GetString(Key);
        }
    }
}

It allows me to write code like this: <TextBlock Text="{GetString txt_login}" />

Before I can use this class I have to initialize ResourceManager. I do it at application startup. Everything works fine except I can't use designer - it will always throw InvalidOperationException. Is there a way to initialize this class before designer tries to instantiate it?

share|improve this question
    
So, basically, the designer is getting to if (ResourceManager == null) and because ResourceManager isn't initialized, the designer is throwing the exception on the next line..? –  jberger Dec 1 '11 at 16:39
    
Yep. But goal here is not to swallow this exception in design mode but actually initialize ResourceManager to display correct strings. –  Poma Dec 1 '11 at 17:05
    
Why can't ResourceManager be initialized within GetString? (Where does it have to be initialized and why?) –  jberger Dec 1 '11 at 17:15
    
There are 2 assemblies: 1. Utility assembly which contains GetString class and knows nothing about main assembly. 2. Main assembly that contains all the controls, and supplies its ResourceManager. It should initialize GetString –  Poma Dec 1 '11 at 17:42
    
I'd suggest creating something similar to an attached property which you set in your App.xaml file. (App.xaml is executed at design-time.) This blog article shows a GREAT example of design-time code and would seem to be a great start for your situation. –  jberger Dec 1 '11 at 19:02
add comment

1 Answer

One option is to add a property to this class, or in a static class somewhere as follows:

public bool IsDesignTime
{
    get
    {
       return (System.Windows.Application.Current == null) || (System.Windows.Application.Current.GetType() == typeof(System.Windows.Application));
    }
}

Then modify you Extension:

public override object ProvideValue(IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
{
    if (IsDesignTime)
    {
        // add code to init resource manager for design time
    }
    if (ResourceManager == null) 
        throw new InvalidOperationException();
    return ResourceManager.GetString(Key);
}

The other option, is to just initialize the ResourceManager in this class if it's null. Either works.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.