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I am using stopifnot and I understand it just returns the first value that was not TRUE. I f that is some freaky dynamic expression someone who is not into the custom function cannot really make something out of that. So I would love to add a custom error message. Any suggestions?

Error: length(unique(nchar(check))) == 1 is not TRUE

Basically states that the elements of the vector check do not have the same length. Is there a way of saying: Error: Elements of your input vector do not have the same length!?

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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Use stop and an if statement:

if(length(unique(nchar(check))) != 1) 
  stop("Error: Elements of your input vector do not have the same length!")

Just remember that stopifnot has the convenience of stating the negative, so your condition in the if needs to be the negation of your stop condition.


This is what the error message looks like:

> check = c("x", "xx", "xxx")
> if(length(unique(nchar(check))) != 1) 
+   stop("Error: Elements of your input vector do not have the same length!")

Error in eval(expr, envir, enclos) : 
  Error: Elements of your input vector do not have the same length!
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1  
what's stop if not good for then? I mean using if is the intuitive solution. It's there in almost every language, even in english. Is there some particular use case for stopifnot? –  Matt Bannert Dec 1 '11 at 18:13
    
@ran2 it's a lot quicker to write stopifnot. –  Xu Wang Dec 1 '11 at 18:50
2  
@ran2 The use case for stopifnot is precisely what you are using it for at the moment. It's very intuitive. But it doesn't produce pretty error messages. Horses for courses, as they say in English. –  Andrie Dec 1 '11 at 19:29
2  
@ran2. stopifnot is a quick way to check multiple conditions on the input. so for instance, if you could say stopifnot(A > 0, B < = 0, C == TRUE) and ensure that the code stops when either of the three conditions are not satisfied. –  Ramnath Dec 1 '11 at 19:56
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Or you could package it up.

assert <- function (expr, error) {
  if (! expr) stop(error, call. = FALSE)
}

So you have:

> check = c("x", "xx", "xxx")
> assert(length(unique(nchar(check))) == 1, "Elements of your input vector do not have the same length!")

Error: Elements of your input vector do not have the same length!
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I would recommend you check out Hadley's testthat package. It allows for intuitive testing: the names of the functions are great and the way you write them is like a sentence -- "I expect that length(unique(nchar(check))) is [exactly|approximately] 1". The errors produced are informative.

See here: http://journal.r-project.org/archive/2011-1/RJournal_2011-1_Wickham.pdf

In your case,

> library(testthat)
> check = c("x", "xx", "xxx")
> expect_that(length(unique(nchar(check))), equals(1))
Error: length(unique(nchar(check))) not equal to 1
Mean relative difference: 2

Also note that you don't have the problem that @Andrie referenced with sometimes having to think about double negatives with stopifnot. I know it seems simple, but it caused me many headaches!

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I agree with using testthat for testing - I use this all the time. However, I find the messages produced by testthat very confusing. This is perfectly acceptable for a developer, but not necessarily the way forward for producing error messages in a package. –  Andrie Dec 1 '11 at 19:13
    
@Andrie Good point! You mean because in testthat you don't specify the error message yourself? –  Xu Wang Dec 1 '11 at 19:20
    
Yes, precisely. –  Andrie Dec 1 '11 at 19:28
    
+1, thx for pointing me to testthat – it makes the thread more comprehensive. Probably going to accept Andrie's answer because I was exactly looking for a way to specify error messages that users understand. –  Matt Bannert Dec 2 '11 at 14:14
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