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This question already has an answer here:

How to get current date d/m/y. I need that they have 3 different variables not one, for example day=d; month=m; year=y;.

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marked as duplicate by Mark Hurd, ugoren, andyb, mkaes, Sergey K. Feb 17 '14 at 14:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
You must specify a platform. – unwind Dec 1 '11 at 15:20
    
What have you tried? stackoverflow.com/questions/997946/c-get-current-time-and-date – daniloquio Dec 1 '11 at 15:20
2  
what have you tried? google for c++ date time gives a lot of matches... – Fredrik Pihl Dec 1 '11 at 15:20
    
@Fredrik, it's simpler to ask than do research. – Marius Bancila Feb 1 '13 at 11:03
up vote 17 down vote accepted

For linux, you would use the 'localtime' function.

#include <time.h>

time_t theTime = time(NULL);
struct tm *aTime = localtime(&theTime);

int day = aTime->tm_mday;
int month = aTime->tm_mon + 1; // Month is 0 - 11, add 1 to get a jan-dec 1-12 concept
int year = aTime->tm_year + 1900; // Year is # years since 1900
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Did you mean localtime(&time(NULL)); ? – maximus Feb 1 '13 at 2:53
    
I corrected the answer as it would not compile as-is. You can't an rvalue by pointer (i.e. just a number) so you need to put it into a variable first – Petesh Feb 1 '13 at 11:01

Here is the chrono way (C++0x) - see it live on http://ideone.com/yFm9P

#include <chrono>
#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

typedef std::chrono::system_clock Clock;

int main()
{
    auto now = Clock::now();
    std::time_t now_c = Clock::to_time_t(now);
    struct tm *parts = std::localtime(&now_c);

    std::cout << 1900 + parts->tm_year  << std::endl;
    std::cout << 1    + parts->tm_mon   << std::endl;
    std::cout <<        parts->tm_mday  << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
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1  
posted the working example live on ideone.com/yFm9P – sehe Dec 1 '11 at 15:52
    
@PaoloM that header is required for std::time_t – sehe Sep 10 '15 at 12:36
    
Sorry, under gcc 4.8 it compiles without <ctime>. It gets included by <chrono> for sure. – Paolo M Sep 10 '15 at 12:43

The ctime library provide such functionnality.

Also check this. It is an other post that might help you out depending on your platform.

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#include <ctime> #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { time_t t = time(0); // get time now struct tm * now = localtime( & t ); cout << (now->tm_year + 1900) << '-' << (now->tm_mon + 1) << '-' << now->tm_mday << endl; } Thanks – Wizard Dec 1 '11 at 15:34

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