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I have to run comparisons between thousands of pairs of objects, and then perform actions depending on the differences.

Is there an "accepted" way of doing this?

class ObjectA
{
    public string FieldA { get; set; }
    public string FieldB { get; set; }
    public string FieldC { get; set; }
}

class ObjectB
{
    public string FieldA { get; set; }
    public string FieldB { get; set; }
    public string FieldC { get; set; }

    public bool Equals(ObjectA obj)
    {
        if ((object)obj == null) return false;
        if (this.FieldA != obj.FieldA) return false;
        if (this.FieldB != obj.FieldB) return false;
        if (this.FieldC != obj.FieldC) return false;
        return true;            
    }
}

void test()
{
    ObjectA a = new ObjectA();
    ObjectB b = new ObjectB();
    if (b.Equals(a))
    {
         Console.WriteLine("Same!!");
    }
}

That does a fairly simple test to determine if b=a, but I also want to know what is different between them.

Should I add a differences() method that returns a list of properties? That seems a bit not.net though, as then I'll be bandying about strings.

public List<string> Differences(ObjectA obj)
{
    List<string> differences = new List<string>();
    if ((object)obj == null)
    {
        differences.Add("null");
    }
    else
    {
        if (this.FieldA != obj.FieldA) differences.Add("FieldA");
        if (this.FieldB != obj.FieldB) differences.Add("FieldB");
        if (this.FieldC != obj.FieldC) differences.Add("FieldC");
    }
    return differences;
}

Also that seems much slower than the first, as I would be creating all those List<string>, and not short-cutting the comparisons. Or is that just the price I pay for having the extra information?

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

There is nothing built in that will allow you to represent partial objects (i.e the differences).

Your approach seems reasonable for what you are trying to achieve.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - at least I'm not barking completely up the wrong tree. – Cylindric Dec 1 '11 at 15:29
    
@Cylindric - You could serialize both objects to JSON and return the string diff on them ;) – Oded Dec 1 '11 at 15:31
    
Although, you could achieve the wanted effect with reflection, going trough all properties in an object. Thus you could add a function like a extension method, something like List<string> Differences<T>(this T a, this T b) { use reflection to find differences }, and could thus call this method on all objects. – Alxandr Dec 1 '11 at 15:32
    
@Alxandr - Yep, though chances are good that both reflection and serialization would be much slower. – Oded Dec 1 '11 at 15:33
1  
@Alxandr - I was joking. See the little ;) at the end of the comment? – Oded Dec 1 '11 at 15:34

Maybe you should try this:

http://comparenetobjects.codeplex.com/

All credit to the author...

share|improve this answer
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

class ObjectA
{
    public string PropertyA { get; set; }
    public string PropertyB { get; set; }
    public string PropertyC { get; set; }
    public DateTime PropertyD { get; set; }

    public string FieldA;
    public DateTime FieldB;
}

class ObjectB
{
    public string PropertyA { get; set; }
    public string PropertyB { get; set; }
    public string PropertyC { get; set; }
    public DateTime PropertyD { get; set; }


    public string FieldA;
    public DateTime FieldB;


}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // create two objects with same properties
        ObjectA a = new ObjectA() { PropertyA = "test", PropertyB = "test2", PropertyC = "test3" };
        ObjectB b = new ObjectB() { PropertyA = "test", PropertyB = "test2", PropertyC = "test3" };

        // add fields to those objects
        a.FieldA = "hello";
        b.FieldA = "Something differnt";

        if (a.ComparePropertiesTo(b))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("objects have the same properties");
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("objects have diferent properties!");
        }


        if (a.CompareFieldsTo(b))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("objects have the same Fields");
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("objects have diferent Fields!");
        }

        Console.Read();
    }
}

public static class Utilities
{
    public static bool ComparePropertiesTo(this Object a, Object b)
    {
        System.Reflection.PropertyInfo[] properties = a.GetType().GetProperties(); // get all the properties of object a

        foreach (var property in properties)
        {
            var propertyName = property.Name;

            var aValue = a.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName).GetValue(a, null);
            object bValue;

            try // try to get the same property from object b. maybe that property does
                // not exist! 
            {
                bValue = b.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName).GetValue(b, null);
            }
            catch
            {
                return false;
            }


            if (aValue == null && bValue == null)
              continue;

            if (aValue == null && bValue != null)
              return false;

            if (aValue != null && bValue == null)
              return false;

            // if properties do not match return false
            if (aValue.GetHashCode() != bValue.GetHashCode())
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }



    public static bool CompareFieldsTo(this Object a, Object b)
    {
        System.Reflection.FieldInfo[] fields = a.GetType().GetFields(); // get all the properties of object a

        foreach (var field in fields)
        {
            var fieldName = field.Name;

            var aValue = a.GetType().GetField(fieldName).GetValue(a);

            object bValue;

            try // try to get the same property from object b. maybe that property does
            // not exist! 
            {
                bValue = b.GetType().GetField(fieldName).GetValue(b);
            }
            catch
            {
                return false;
            }

            if (aValue == null && bValue == null)
               continue;

            if (aValue == null && bValue != null)
               return false;

            if (aValue != null && bValue == null)
               return false;

            // if properties do not match return false
            if (aValue.GetHashCode() != bValue.GetHashCode())
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }


}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that it does not work when comparing some properties. you can exclude some properties by implementing the methods and if the property.name = "propertyYouSpecify" continue the loop. – Tono Nam Dec 1 '11 at 22:19
    
Remember that a variable can hold a value or a reference. for example if you instantiate an object from a class that instance variable will hold the address where that object is located. if you instantiate an object from a struct on the other hand then that variable will hold the value. so that's why you don't have to worry when you compare int variables because you are comparing their value. but if you compare objects then you have to be more careful. that's why strings are sometimes refereed to as magical because they are objects and when you compare them using == you are comparing its value – Tono Nam Dec 1 '11 at 22:22

As long as the names of the properties are equal, you can do this using the property map of each object and linq. I've done this in the past, but I don't have the code in front of me at the moment, sorry.

share|improve this answer

Here's an example I used for unit testing two instances of the same object type. I was testing to ensure that the properties that were serialized to file and populated in a new instance of the same object type were the same. Note that this is using System.Reflection and that you are comparing instances of the same type.

//Assume yourobjectA and yourobjectB have already been instantiated and populated.

//loop throught he properties and compare
//they should all be set the same as the previous instance
            PropertyInfo[] propertiesA = yourobjectA.GetType().GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);
            PropertyInfo[] propertiesB = yourobjectB.GetType().GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);


            int count = oldProperties.Length;

            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                if ((propertiesA [i].CanRead) && (propertiesB [i].CanRead))
                {
                    if (propertiesA [i].PropertyType == typeof(String))
                    {
                        object oldStringValue = (string)propertiesA[i].GetValue(yourobjectA, null);
                        object newStringValue = (string)propertiesB[i].GetValue(yourobjectB., null);
                        if(oldStringValue != newStringValue )
                {
                //Do something
                }
                    }

                    if (propertiesA [i].PropertyType == typeof(Boolean))
                    {
                        object oldBoolValue = (bool)propertiesA [i].GetValue(yourobjectA, null);
                        object newBoolValue = (bool)propertiesB [i].GetValue(yourobjectB., null);
                        if(oldBoolValue != newBoolValue)
                {
                //Do something
                }
                    }
                }
            }
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