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I have a script that loop and each iteration invoke a thread that run in a background like below

xn_run_process.sh

...
for each in `ls ${INPUT_DIR}/MDX*.txt`
do
      java -Xms256m -Xmx1024m -cp ${CLASSPATH} com.wf.xn.etcc.Main -config=${CONFIG_FILE}
      ...
      for SCALE_PDF in `ls ${PROCESS_DIR}/*.pdf`
      do
          OUTPUT_AFP=${OUTPUT_DIR}/`basename ${SCALE_PDF}`
          OUTPUT_AFP=`print ${OUTPUT_AFP} | sed s/pdf/afp/g`
          ${PROJ_DIR}/myscript.sh -i ${SCALE_PDF} -o ${OUTPUT_AFP} &
          sleep 30
      done
done

When I did this, I only think that it will be only 5 threads of myscript.sh be concurrently executed at one time, however things change, and this list execute 30 threads, each does quite heavy process. How do I constraint the number of concurrent processes to 5?

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3 Answers 3

While this is possible in pure shell scripting, the easiest approach would be using a parallelization tool like GNU parallel or GNU make. Makefile example:

SOURCES = ${SOME_LIST}
STAMPS = $(SOME_LIST:=.did-run-stamp)

all : $(STAMPS)

%.did-run-stamp : %
    /full/path/myscript.sh -f $<

and then calling make as make -j 5.

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hi do you call make -j 5 inside the script or on the shell? and dont you have to put a target for the make? –  Thang Pham Dec 1 '11 at 15:59
    
can you also explain a bit about did-run-stamp, please? –  Thang Pham Dec 1 '11 at 16:09
1  
Inside the shell, in the directory where the shown file is the Makefile. Make by default uses the first target (all by convention), and the did-run-stamp is just a dummy file name that does not already exist and acts as a target for make. If you would use the original filenames, make would just check that all files are present and succeed without action. –  thiton Dec 1 '11 at 16:30
    
I have updated some codes, with two more questions, will you please show me? Thank you so much –  Thang Pham Dec 1 '11 at 17:06
    
@HarryPham: Sorry, but I feel I'm drifting too far from advice-giving to code-writing here. My post is (of course, like every other) open for editing, if there is someone who feels more motivated. This thing should be pretty straigt-forward with make. If you really can't get forward, get a nice make tutorial; info make is a good start. –  thiton Dec 1 '11 at 17:59

Use GNU Parallel (adjust -j as you see fit. Remove it if you want # of CPUs):

for each in `ls ${INPUT_DIR}/MDX*.txt`
do
      java -Xms256m -Xmx1024m -cp ${CLASSPATH} com.wf.xn.etcc.Main -config=${CONFIG_FILE}
      ...
      for SCALE_PDF in `ls ${PROCESS_DIR}/*.pdf`
      do
          OUTPUT_AFP=${OUTPUT_DIR}/`basename ${SCALE_PDF}`
          OUTPUT_AFP=`print ${OUTPUT_AFP} | sed s/pdf/afp/g`
          sem --id myid -j 5 ${PROJ_DIR}/myscript.sh -i ${SCALE_PDF} -o ${OUTPUT_AFP}
      done
done
sem --wait --id myid

sem is part of GNU Parallel.

This will keep 5 jobs running until there is only 5 jobs left. Then it will allow your java to run while finishing the last 5. The sem --wait will wait until the last 5 are finished, too.

Alternatively:

for each ...
   java ...
   ...
   ls ${PROCESS_DIR}/*.pdf |
   parallel -j 5 ${PROJ_DIR}/myscript.sh -i {} -o ${OUTPUT_DIR}/{/.}.afp
done

This will run 5 jobs in parallel and only let java run when all the jobs are finished.

Alternatively you can use the queue trick described in GNU Parallel's man page: https://www.gnu.org/software/parallel/man.html#example__gnu_parallel_as_queue_system_batch_manager

echo >jobqueue; tail -f jobqueue | parallel -j5 &
for each ...
   ...
   ls ${PROCESS_DIR}/*.pdf |
   parallel echo ${PROJ_DIR}/myscript.sh -i {} -o ${OUTPUT_DIR}/{/.}.afp >> jobqueue
done
echo killall -TERM parallel >> jobqueue
wait

This will run java, then add jobs to be run to a queue. After adding jobs java will be run immediately. At all time 5 jobs will be run from the queue until the queue is empty.

You can install GNU Parallel simply by:

wget http://git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/parallel.git/plain/src/parallel
chmod 755 parallel
cp parallel sem

Watch the intro videos to learn more: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL284C9FF2488BC6D1 and walk through the tutorial (man parallel_tutorial). You command line with love you for it.

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If you have ksh93 check if JOBMAX is available:

JOBMAX

This variable defines the maximum number running background
jobs that can run at a time. When this limit is reached, the
shell will wait for a job to complete before staring a new job.
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