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I want search a specific attribute in an XML tree, afterwards I want extract the part of the tree in which this attribute is contained.

Example:

<records>   
    <name>Rose</name>
    <date>12-1-11</date>
</records>
<records>   
    <name>jon</name>
    <date>12-1-11</date>
</records>
<records>   
    <name>Tom</name>
    <date>12-1-11</date>
</records>

I want to search for "Rose" and get the entire <records> element and its children.


Thanks everyone, you are very fast.

I have another question if I have some more nodes and they aren´t records how can I search in all of them?

<records>   
    <name>Rose</name>
    <date>12-1-11</date>
</records>
<cars>   
    <name>jon</name>
    <date>12-1-11</date>
</cars>
<houses>   
    <name>Tom</name>
    <date>12-1-11</date>
</houses>

This time I will search by date = 11-1-11.

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2  
Please specify get. I guess the date... –  lucapette Dec 1 '11 at 15:56
    
I guess this will be a XPath answer :) –  willcodejavaforfood Dec 1 '11 at 16:21
    
Please don't add multiple questions. Create a new question, and reference this one. –  the Tin Man Dec 4 '11 at 8:23

3 Answers 3

You're not selecting on an attribute but on an element. That's a difference. Anyway, here's the XPath expression you could use:

//records[name[text()='Rose']]

Can also be made shorter:

//records[name='Rose']

Or if you're wary of white space messing things up:

//records[name[normalize-space(text()) = 'Rose']]
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Since this user is new to Nokogiri, you might include how to use XPath to find an element, i.e. doc = Nokogiri.XML(IO.read('my.xml')); record = doc.at_xpath("//records[name='Rose']"); also, since you showed one 'shorter', you might also include //records[normalize-space(name)='Rose'] –  Phrogz Dec 1 '11 at 16:55

The XPath-based answer by @G_H is what I would personally use. However, for completeness, here's how you might do this in Nokogiri using only the CSS selector syntax and a little more Ruby:

names = doc.css('name')
rose  = names.find{ |el| el.text == "Rose" }
rose_record = rose.parent

Or on a single line:

rec = doc.css('name').find{ |el| el.text=="Rose" }.parent

For more info see the Enumerable#find documentation.

Edit: Since you're new to Nokogiri, here's how you create a document to start querying:

require 'nokogiri' # gem install nokogiri 
doc = Nokogiri.XML(File.read('my.xml'))
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+1. Better suited to question than my answer. I'm no Ruby nor Nokogiri expert, so I focused on the expression. –  G_H Dec 1 '11 at 16:58

I don't know of Ruby or Nokogiri but tested next xpath expression in xqilla and seems to work.

//records[data(name) = "Rose"]

Output:

<records>   
    <name>Rose</name>
    <date>12-1-11</date>
</records>
share|improve this answer
1  
That's an XPath 2 expression. I don't think Nokogiri supports this. –  G_H Dec 1 '11 at 16:28

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