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I have a series of Read() overloads in a class. Each opens the file only long enough to read, so I have:

public void Read(blah)
{
    using (FileStream stream = new FileStream(Path, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
    using (BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(stream))
    {
        //read some stuff        
    }
}

public void Read(blah blah)
{
    using (FileStream stream = new FileStream(Path, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
    using (BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(stream))
    {
        //read some different stuff        
    }
}

Is there any way of wrapping the stream and reader creation in a function, and yet still retain the using() to dispose everything automatically? eg

public void Read(blah)
{
    using (var reader = GetReader())
    {
        //read some stuff        
    }
}

public void Read(blah blah)
{
    using (var reader = GetReader())
    {
        //read some different stuff        
    }
}

private BinaryReader GetReader()
{
    //How do I dispose this stream?
    FileStream stream = new FileStream(Path, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))

    return new BinaryReader(stream);
}
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1  
What is the difference between your 2 Read methods? –  JaredPar Dec 1 '11 at 16:26
    
@JaredPar: Unfortunately, enough that I cannot just have them defer all the overloads to one implementation. –  GazTheDestroyer Dec 1 '11 at 16:29
    
@JaredPar : I believe this is could be removed since only confusing and not related to main point of the question, but I'mnot sure we need to ask OP –  sll Dec 1 '11 at 16:30
    
@GazTheDestroyer so they are different overloads? –  JaredPar Dec 1 '11 at 16:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In this specific case, you don't have to dispose your stream. Upon disposal, the BinaryReader will automatically dispose the underlying stream.

But maybe the BinaryReader is just an example?

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Nope, this is pretty much the code. I didn't realise BinaryReader did that. What if you still needed the stream afterwards? :-? –  GazTheDestroyer Dec 1 '11 at 16:31
    
Well, usually you either read or write in a stream. I don't remember that I had to read and write in the same stream even once. And if you only do read operations, why would you need another reader afterward? But anyway, if you're in that rare case where you need the stream afterward, you're pretty much doomed :p The easiest way is then probably to inherit the BinaryReader and provide your own implementation of the Dispose method, to avoid closing the stream. –  KooKiz Dec 1 '11 at 16:36
    
Or set the BaseStream to null through reflection, so the BinaryReader cannot close it. Some people are going to have nightmares when reading this suggestion :D –  KooKiz Dec 1 '11 at 16:39

In this particular case, BinaryReader is responsible for the passed stream and will Close it properly on disposal.

If however you wish to avoid such boilerplate in the future, the following may serve as a useful example:

private class MyReader : BinaryReader, IDisposable
    {
        private readonly Stream _input;

        public MyReader(Stream input) : base(input)
        {
            _input = input;
        }

        void IDisposable.Dispose()
        {
            Dispose();
            _input.Dispose();
        }
    }
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Because using is just a shorthand for try-finally block, you can do something like:


class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        using (var b = GetReader())
        {
        }
    }

    static B GetReader()
    {
        using (var a = new A())
        {
            return new B(a);
        }
    }
}

class A : IDisposable
{

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Dispose A");
    }
}

class B : IDisposable
{
    public B(object obj)
    {
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Dispose B");
    }
}

In your case:


public void Read(blah)
{
    using (var reader = GetReader())
    {
        //read some stuff        
    }
}

public void Read(blah blah)
{
    using (var reader = GetReader())
    {
        //read some different stuff        
    }
}

private BinaryReader GetReader()
{
    //How do I dispose this stream?
    using(FileStream stream = new FileStream(Path, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
    {
        return new BinaryReader(stream);
    }
}
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