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I have two classes with one extending the other. They both have a method called doSomething() that perform something different. I want to be able to have one pointer that I can switch from class A to class B and have the rest of the code run the same because they each have the same method name. Is this possible and is this the correct way to do it? Also, I'm pretty new to C++ so it could be just a problem with that.

class A {
    void doSomething()
    {
        // does something
    }
};

class B: public A {
    void doSomething()
    {
        //does something else
    }
};


main()
{
    A *ptr = new A;
    B *bptr = new B;

    // a giant loop

    ptr->doSomething();


    if(condition) 
    {
        ptr = bptr;
    }
}
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1  
Basically, but you will need three pointers -- one for each of the objects and one to hold "the one you are using". This will help you to avoid leaking memory when switching out "the one you are using". –  Chad Dec 1 '11 at 17:02
2  
The better question is "why do you think you need this?". –  Cat Plus Plus Dec 1 '11 at 17:05
2  
your code as posted has three problems. First, you're changing ptr only after you've used it. Second, as written you would have a memory leak. Shared pointers support polymorphic behaviour so I would use them. Third, in C++ you have to request this behaviour by declaring the function virtual. Any introductory C++ text or course will cover polymorphism in more detail than we can do here. –  Kate Gregory Dec 1 '11 at 17:09
    
You may be misusing polymorphism. One of the great advantages of polymorphism is that you don't have to use conditionals to determine which implementation is called on a given method - the type determines it. –  David V Dec 1 '11 at 17:11
    
@DavidV: precisely the inverse could be argued: the OP could be using polymorphism to avoid having to spread if (condition) throughout the whole `giant loop` –  sehe Dec 1 '11 at 17:20
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you are trying to achieve is called polymorphism. In C++, you will need to define a common (possibly abstract) base class C for A and B, make doSomething a virtual function, override it in both A and B, and make pointers of type C*. Here is a good introductory article on the topic.

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1  
No you don't. An A* that might be pointing to an A or a B is fine. You are right that doSomething has to be virtual. –  Kate Gregory Dec 1 '11 at 17:06
    
@KateGregory You're right, I did not realize that OP's inheriting A in B because of the syntax (he has class B() : public A() instead of class B : public A. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 1 '11 at 17:11
    
the original code has plenty of problems -} where }; belongs, function bodies with :: inside class defintion etc. And those round brackets are especially good. –  Kate Gregory Dec 1 '11 at 17:16
    
Yeah sorry for the pseudo code I was just trying to get the idea but yeah this seems to be the solution. I wasn't very familiar with virtual functions but this really helped thanks! –  Paul Dec 1 '11 at 19:18
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Two ways I can think of to accomplish this.

Your way is fine (with some small changes) if you already have polymorphic types). (If B is-an A, logically)

class A
{
public:
    virtual void f() { /* something */ };
};

class B : public A
{
public:
   virtual void f() { /* something else */ };
};

int main()
{
   A a;
   B b;
   A* c = 0;

   // based on your condition
   c = &a;
   c->f();
   c = &b;
   c->f();

   return 0;
}

But what if your types aren't really that closely related? Using inheritance implies a very rigid (is-a, in this case) relationship between your classes. Is a B really an A?

Here's a way to accomplish this for classes that have the same named function, but aren't really of similar types.

template <class T>
void do_f(T& obj)
{
   obj.f();
}

class D
{
public:
   void f() { /* something */ }
};

class E
{
public:
   void f() { /* something else entirely */ }
};

int main()
{
   // note, D and E have no relation
   D d;
   E e;

   // based on your condition
   do_f(d);
   do_f(e);
}
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The template-based approach would not let him do what he's trying to do, though, because do_f(d) and do_f(e) are resolved at compile time. Switching pointers suggested in the OP works only with the polymorphic approach. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 1 '11 at 17:20
    
@dasblinkenlight: if (a) do_f(d); else do_f(e); it compiles at run time, but can conditionally execute at compile time. –  Mooing Duck Dec 1 '11 at 18:08
    
@MooingDuck That's absolutely true, but it defeats the purpose of the OP, as it is the if statement that he us trying to avoid in the first place. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 1 '11 at 18:16
    
The template-based approach is appropriate if he does not have polymorphic types. Based on the question as posted, he wouldn't need a condition if he had polymorhpic types (as opposed to just types with the same function name). –  Chad Dec 1 '11 at 18:42
1  
That being the case, then you should prefer the polymorphic way (the first section of my answer). –  Chad Dec 1 '11 at 19:18
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