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I'm new to Spring 3, and its fancy additional annotations in particular

I have no idea how to have a controller class B, that extends controller class A, where A is defined via the xml files to have something useful - say, a db connection or whatever.

If I have an (abstract) parent bean A, and a concrete bean B, and B is a controller, AND i'm using the annotations-auto-wiring (you know, <context:component-scan base-package="package"/> ), can I somehow tie B to A? Do i use annotations? Where do i define A, given that A needs to have some random spring bean put into it?

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2  
If you want answers, ask clear, concise questions--doesn't seem that overbearing. –  Dave Newton Dec 1 '11 at 18:02
    
Prefer composition over inheritance. Don't put that db connection in a controller class, put it in a db connection class. Your class B can then depend on a db connection, and when a B is needed it will be created and injected with the db connection. –  Nate W. Dec 1 '11 at 21:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Having a database connection in your controller, as @Shakedown mentions, is a bad practice. I know it's just an example, but I wanted to make sure that was pointed out.

With Spring annotations, you can get away from XML almost completely, for most projects.

It is common to have an AbstractController class, from which other concrete classes are derived.

@Controller
@RequestMapping(value = "/action")
public class AController extends AbstractController
{
    @Autowired
    private AService aService;
    ...
}

Dependencies can be injected into Spring classes using the @Autowired annotation. If you want to inject dependencies into your AbstractController, which is not technically a Spring managed class - you can make it one simply by adding the @Component annotation.

@Component
public abstract class AbstractController
{
    @Autowired
    protected CommonService commonService;

    @ExceptionHandler(MyException.class)
    public ModelAndView handleMyException(MyException e)
    {  
        ModelAndView model = new ModelAndView();

        model.addObject("errorMessage", e.getMessage());

        model.setViewName("error");

        return model;
    }

    ...
}

You can then use the dependency in your subclasses.

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Thanks that was what i wanted! But question, why would I try and override the AbstractController, instead of just defining my own AbstractController-derived abstract class? –  bharal Dec 2 '11 at 20:40

This isn't really an answer - but it is the solution for i took in the end! It pretty much just expands on the answer given by Beau and skaffman, I'm just putting it here to be complete.

Given:

@Controller
class B extends A {

... B things done here! They use something!

}

and

abstact class A {

 private Object something;

 public void setSomething(Object something);
 public Object getSomething();
}

and where I used to have:

<bean id="A" abstract="true"
    class="package.to.A">
    <property name="something">
        <bean ref to something here>
    </property>        
</bean>

and

<bean id="B" parent="A"
    class="package.to.B">
</bean>

I know have (dun dun DUUUN):

<context:component-scan base-package="package.to.A"/>

<bean ref to something here with an id - it was an inner bean before>

<!-- no A or B beans defined -->

and

abstact class A {

 @Autowired
 private Object something;

 public void setSomething(Object something);
 public Object getSomething();
}

I didn't need the @Component on my AbstractController-derived abstract class, but I take it you mean i need the @Component if I want to do something with abstractController?

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