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I'm dealing with a problem in my Go Game project.

I have a board (goban), represented by 2D Array of chars. Before every next move, I would like to check for 'bubbles' in the array. Bubble should be an 4-connected area of identical chars surrounded in 4 directions by another group of specific identical chars. If this 'bubble' exists, the characters inside should be replaced by some others. But there could be more areas and not all of them are enclosed. For example, I have this board:

      1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10 11 12 13
   -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  - 
 A |  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  | 
 B |  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  | 
 C |  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  | 
 D |  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  | 
 E |  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  | 
 F |  +  +  O  O  O  O  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  | 
 G |  +  O  X  X  X  X  O  +  +  +  +  +  +  | 
 H |  +  +  O  O  X  X  O  +  +  +  +  +  +  | 
 I |  +  +  +  +  O  X  X  O  +  +  +  +  +  | 
 J |  +  +  +  +  O  X  O  +  +  +  +  +  +  | 
 K |  +  +  +  +  +  O  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  | 
 L |  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  | 
 M |  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  +  | 
   -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  - 

And I would like to find the bubble of Xs, count them and replace them with 'Z's.

I've googled it and I think that some Connected-component labeling algorithm or FloodFill can do the job, but I'm not sure how to implement it. Is this the way or something less complicated could solve it? Thank you

Edit: I tried to find some pattern which could find the areas of specific character and count their liberties, but it always failed when the location was multilayered. Changing the data structure might be the solution, but if it is possible, I would like to do it as it is now.

My current solution idea:

public void solve(){
if (boardContainsEnclosedAreas(goban, onMovePlayerStone, oppositePlayerStone){
    onMovePlayerScore += countElementsInAreaAndReplaceThem(onMovePlayerStone, 'Z');  
}
}

public boolean boardContainsEnclosedAreas(char[][] playingBoard, char searchedChar, char surroundingChar){
// this method should find the bubble in the playingBoard array
}

public int countElementsInAreaAndReplaceThem(char searchedChar, char replacingChar){
// the method should go through the bubble and replace all inner chars 
// returns amount of replaced chars
}
share|improve this question
    
What have you tried so far? –  Mark Elliot Dec 1 '11 at 19:09
    
Have you considered other data structures? Maybe you could have a Chain class which contains all the connected tiles of the same color. It would have some number of liberties, and the chain would be removed when liberties reaches 0. –  Jay Conrod Dec 1 '11 at 19:22
    
Will be great if you post your 'desired output' as well. –  Bhushan Dec 1 '11 at 20:01
    
Thank you guys, I've updated the description –  jC30 Dec 2 '11 at 13:47

2 Answers 2

You can do that with a recursive method, indeed using the FloodFill theory.

Basically, run through your grid, and each time you find an X, replace it with a Z, as well as its 4 neighbours (if applicable). But the trick is: instead of just replacing them and having to loop again each time, call the same (calling) method again to do it. The recursivity will do the rest.

Here is a (quickly done) pseudo-code version of it: (assuming your grid is indexed from 0 to xmax, from 0 to ymax)

int numberOfBubbles = 0;

for (x = 0 to xmax) {
    for (y = 0 to ymax) {
       if (getCharAt(x, y) == "X") { // this if is needed because you want to count the bubbles. If not, you could just do handleBubble(x, y);
           numberOfBubbles++;
           handleBubble(x, y);
       }
    }
}

// Recursive method
void handleBubble(int x, int y) {
    if (getCharAt(x, y) != "X") {
        return; // exit condition
    }

    getCharAt(x, y) = "Z";    
    if (x > 0) handleBubble(x-1, y);
    if (x < xmax) handleBubble(x+1, y);
    if (y > 0) handleBubble(x, y-1);
    if (y < ymax) handleBubble(x, y+1);
}

As far as I know, this is the only solution for this problem, which works whatever weird shape your bubble is. The complexity is not bad either.

This can be optimised further, as it currently checks for chars that are obviously not containing an X any more (because they've just been replaced with Z). This is left as an exercise to the reader :)

(NB: The minesweeper game, among other, is based on that solution)

share|improve this answer
    
The task requested is more complicated: you first have to figure out if you want to flip the X's in a region or not. –  toto2 Dec 2 '11 at 14:50
    
Hmmm. Are you saying the OP is interested only in blocks of X surrounded by O? That is not clearly mentioned in the description (or it's just me). That would indeed make it more complex. I'll think about it. –  Guillaume Dec 2 '11 at 15:05
    
That can probably still be done by that method: while handling the bubble, if you find a neighbouring char that is not a "X" neither a "O", you stop the process and revert the grid. That will ensure only bubbles of X surrounded by O finish the process, and flip the X. –  Guillaume Dec 2 '11 at 15:11
    
Yes, or instead of reverting the changes, you could just store in memory the positions that you might have to change and only do so at the end if you never hit a blank square. –  toto2 Dec 2 '11 at 15:14
    
In the rules of Go, you "eat" your opponents pieces if you completely surround them. It's a fun game, but I'm not good at it. The rules are much simpler than chess, but it's actually a more complicated game. –  toto2 Dec 2 '11 at 15:18

Here's an algorithm (in pseudocode) that I've used for similar image analysis needs:

regions = Collection<Set<Point>>
foreach (Point p : allBoardLocations)
  if (charAtLocation(p) != 'X') continue
  foundInRegion = false
  for (Set<Point> s : regions)
    if (s.contains(p))
      foundInRegion=true
      break;
  if (!foundInRegion)
    newRegion = new Set<Point>()
    stack = new Stack<Point>()
    stack.push(p)
    while (!stack.empty())
      foreach (Point n : neighboringPoints(stack.pop()))
        if (charAtLocation(n) == 'X')
          if (!newRegion.contains(n))
            newRegion.add(n);
            stack.push(n);

Bascially, you maintain a collection of sets of points where each set represents a "bubble" of contiguous points on the board. Scan each location on the board and if it's an 'X' and it is not already in a region then create a new region and a stack containing the location and while there is any item on the stack, visit its neighbors searching for unvisited 'X's, adding them to the new region and stack as discovered.

At the end the you'll have a collection of sets of points, each representing a "bubble".

share|improve this answer
    
@toto2: yes, thanks, I just kinda spit this out off the top of my head. I'm sure it's fraught with errors, just wanted to demonstrate the idea. –  maerics Dec 2 '11 at 14:51

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