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I have a pixel/location, we'll call it 4,4 on a graph. I'm attempting to refactor a function that checks to see if pixels around it, meet a certain criteria, in all 8 directions (diagonally, horizontally, and vertically), and if it meets that criteria, take a common action, that has a return value.

For instance:

int weight=0;
if (CheckWeight(new Point(4,4)) == true)
    weight +=100;
if (CheckWeight(new Point(4,5)) == true)
    weight +=10;
if (CheckWeight(new Point(4,3)) == true)
    weight +=10;
if (CheckWeight(new Point(5,5)) == true)
    weight +=10;
if (CheckWeight(new Point(3,3)) == true)
    weight +=10;
if (CheckWeight(new Point(3,4)) == true)
    weight +=10;
if (CheckWeight(new Point(5,4)) == true)
    weight +=10;
if (CheckWeight(new Point(5,3)) == true)
    weight +=10;
if (CheckWeight(new Point(3,5)) == true)
    weight +=10;

Is there a good way to refactor these, so if I have to change certain things here, such as function I'm calling to check the weight, or condition I'm checking against, or weight increment, that I'm not duplicating my efforts 8 times?

I've had other programmers I know already suggest to just combine them under one check, which I obviously can't do, cause it might meet 3 of these checks, and give me a weight of 30 this time, and 5 of these checks and give me a weight of 50 next time.

Edit: This routine will be run on 1920x1080 pixel maps, so several million times; performance could be a real issue involved in the refactoring.

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1  
was the first +=100 intentionally or just a typo? –  Doc Brown Dec 1 '11 at 19:31
    
First one is intentional, I'm basically looking for an 40 weight, if the first pixel (the actual pixel) meets my condition, so either the pixel I'm checking, or more than half the surrounding pixels, needs to meet the condition I'm checking. –  Brian Deragon Dec 1 '11 at 19:36
1  
The "== true" part is superfluous. CheckWeight already returns a boolean and this is what the if-statement needs. If CheckWeight returns true you basically get true==true --> true. If not, you get false==true --> false. It is like multiplying a number by 1. It does not change anything. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Dec 1 '11 at 19:48
    
true, was focused more on the conditionals, I totally overlooked that! –  Brian Deragon Dec 1 '11 at 19:50
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A possible approach would be to refactor the common code to a for loop that would iterate through all points near the target one. Sample code follows:

var target = new Point(4, 4);

int weight = 0;
if (CheckWeight(target) == true)
    weight += 100;

var points = GetNearestPointsFrom(target);

foreach (var p in points)
{
    if (CheckWeight(p) == true)
        weight += 10;
}

You would need to implement the GetNearestPointsFrom method to return the correct points. By going this way you're also encapsulating the logic for asserting the nearest points in a separate method, which I find more maintainable.


Update: Taking in consideration that you're limited by performance constraints and you mention that you may need to change the CheckWeight by another function, I would verify if wrapping the if checks in a method that accepts a Predicate<Point> and a weight increment value would not affect performance too much. This way changing the CheckWeight method or the increment is performed only once. Sample code:

private static void GetWeight(Predicate<Point> predicate, int weightIncrement)
{
    int weight = 0;
    if (predicate(new Point(4, 4)) == true)
        weight += 100;
    if (predicate(new Point(4, 5)) == true)
        weight += weightIncrement;
    // ... Remaining checks ...
}
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Faster than Dasblin's answer (stackoverflow.com/a/8347171/758118) but it's still magnitudes slower averaging between 18 to 23 seconds. –  Brian Deragon Dec 1 '11 at 19:41
1  
@Brian Deragon, check my comment in the other answer. No one knew of the performance requirements, so most people will answer according to what they know only. –  João Angelo Dec 1 '11 at 19:44
1  
yea, edited question, thanks! –  Brian Deragon Dec 1 '11 at 19:45
    
nice, I like the use of the predicate, that helps a lot; didn't think of that, and it didn't really slow it down, 3 to 5 seconds per run, a bit slower, but I can deal with that, easy price to pay for the maintenance nightmare being gone. –  Brian Deragon Dec 1 '11 at 20:06
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int weight = 0;
for (int dx = -1 ; dx <= 1 ; dx++) {
    for (int dy = -1 ; dy <= 1 ; dy++) {
        if (CheckWeight(new Point(4+dx, 4+dy))) {
            weight += (dx==0 && dy == 0) ? 100 : 10;
        }
     }
}

To speed things up a bit, you can unroll one loop using a cute little trick:

// Declare this in your class
static readonly int[] dd = new int{1,-1,-1,0,-1,1,0,1,1};

// Use this code to calculate the weight
int weight = CheckWeight(new Point(4, 4)) ? 100 : 0;
for (int i = 0 ; i != 8 ; i++) {
    if (CheckWeight(new Point(4+dd[i], 4+dd[i+1]))) {
        weight += 10;
    }
}
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while that works...it runs a lot slower when I check 2.5 million pixels (before it checked them in about 2 seconds, using this method, it takes between 71 and 73 seconds) –  Brian Deragon Dec 1 '11 at 19:37
    
+1 for basically the same idea. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Dec 1 '11 at 19:40
    
@BrianDeragon I see! That must have been the reason why your original code unrolled these loops in the first place. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 1 '11 at 19:40
1  
@Brian Deragon, you hid that requirement from the question, which will probably invalidate most of the answers that did not know you had performance requirements. –  João Angelo Dec 1 '11 at 19:42
    
Sorry, I didn't realize that was an issue myself...until we're checking several million pixels 1000x1000, or 1920x1080 –  Brian Deragon Dec 1 '11 at 19:44
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What about for-loops?

int x = 4;
int y = 4;
int weight = 0; 
for (int dx = -1; dx <= +1; dx++) {
    for (int dy = -1; dy <= +1; dy++) {
        if (CheckWeight(new Point(x+dx, y+dy)))
            weight += 10;
    }
}
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1  
By reviewing your example, I saw that the central point has a +100, not +10. But you can easily correct that. You could also use a 3 x 3 weight matrix (or should I call it filter matrix). This would be a more universal and more flexible approach. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Dec 1 '11 at 19:40
    
while that works (I had to readd my check for +100, its too slow, see dasblins answer, also, code gets a little messy, cause of the center pixel having a different weight. –  Brian Deragon Dec 1 '11 at 19:42
    
When using loops, CheckWeight is called at one place only. You could to what CheckWeight does directly inside of the loops. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Dec 1 '11 at 20:11
    
if performance is an issue, maybe you can avoid creating a Point in every loop and instead calling CheckWeight(x,y) –  ejaenv Dec 2 '11 at 20:20
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