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I'm trying to create a web page in PHP and HTML so that I can read data from a database and automatically publish it to a web page. 

What this web page would need to do is read information already stored in a MySQL database and put it on a web page, without the user needing to physically refresh the web page. 

I have another script that reads information from another website's API and puts that information into a MySQL database. I want this new web page to be able to publish content as the other script collects information and inputs it - as the MySQL server is updated. 

I am assuming that this would require JavaScript, am I right?

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closed as not a real question by Igor, kapa, Jocelyn, plaes, Maroun Maroun Mar 26 '13 at 6:17

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
You need Ajax. w3schools.com/ajax/default.asp –  BernaMariano Dec 1 '11 at 19:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, what you are looking for is called AJAX. Many javascript libraries including jQuery have excellent support for AJAX.

In a nutshell, javascript makes a http request and returns it into a javascript variable where you can do anything you'd like with it.

For MySQL information, you'd probably want to return JSON from the ajax request. jQuery will automatically parse the JSON and convert it into an array/object - thus making it easy to iterate through "rows" and display your information.

I'd recommend taking some jQuery tutorials. When you get a basic understanding, take a look at this jquery AJAX tutorial:

http://viralpatel.net/blogs/2009/04/jquery-ajax-tutorial-example-ajax-jquery-development.html

Once you get the concept, then you can do a javascript setInterval to run the ajax call to automatically check if the database has been updated or not every so often.

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Guys, if you downvote say why. –  middus Dec 1 '11 at 20:15
    
I downvoted because I don't think a beginner should start off with jQuery. Showing plain old javascript tutorials is a better start (like Mr. Pallazzo's answer). –  Florian Margaine Dec 2 '11 at 9:21
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I can see both sides but I don't think suggesting jQuery over vanilla JS is worthy of a downvote. jQuery is becoming more and more of an industry standard, I use it's ajax methods every other day but if you asked me to do it without jQuery then I'd have to look it up to remember how. I'm also guessing if he suggested vanilla js method then people would criticise the answer for not mentioning jQuery. Tough crowd. –  martincarlin87 Mar 25 '13 at 11:34

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