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i found this great little HttpModule that encrypts and decrypts all querystrings. It can be found here: HttpModule for query string encryption

There is one major flaw that i could really use some input on how to solve. On a postback of the page the HttpMethod POST gets skipped and the QueryString gets shown decrypted. Obviously this is a major security risk.

void context_BeginRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    try
    {
        HttpContext context = HttpContext.Current;
        if (context.Request.Url.OriginalString.Contains("aspx") && context.Request.RawUrl.Contains("?"))
        {
            string query = ExtractQuery(context.Request.RawUrl);
            string path = GetVirtualPath();

            if (query.StartsWith(PARAMETER_NAME, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
            {
                // Decrypts the query string and rewrites the path.
                string rawQuery = query.Replace(PARAMETER_NAME, string.Empty);
                string decryptedQuery = Decrypt(rawQuery);
                context.RewritePath(path, string.Empty, decryptedQuery);
            }
            else if (context.Request.HttpMethod == "GET")
            {
                // Encrypt the query string and redirects to the encrypted URL.
                // Remove if you don't want all query strings to be encrypted automatically.
                string encryptedQuery = Encrypt(query);
                context.Response.Redirect(path + encryptedQuery);
            }
        }
    }
    catch (ThreadAbortException)
    {
        //do nothing. let it pass
    }
    catch (Exception exc)
    {
        ReportError(exc);
    }
}

I tried putting a addition if catch for the POST method:

            else if (context.Request.HttpMethod == "POST")
            {
                if (!query.StartsWith(PARAMETER_NAME, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
                {
                    string encryptedQuery = Encrypt(query);
                    context.Response.Redirect(path + encryptedQuery);
                }
            }

However this reloads the page becuase of the Response.Redirect and so the PostBack is useless.

Does anyone have any ideas or know if there is a way to determine is the HttpContext is a PostBack?

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4  
This is not very useful; the plaintext querystring will still go down the wire in the clear. What are you afraid of? Why do you have sensitive information in the querystring? –  SLaks Dec 1 '11 at 20:20
    
Encrypting a querystring is not useful. Use Session and/or ssl instead. –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Dec 1 '11 at 20:24
    
Its not so much as sensitive data, more that i do not want people to modify the querystring directly –  Nugs Dec 1 '11 at 21:13
1  
@Nugs, that is purposefully encumbering the web. This reminds me of when some websites were made entirely in Flash, so you could never use your address bar and go to a desired page in the site. –  Amy Dec 1 '11 at 21:21
1  
@Nugs why not allow your users to navigate around the site by maniupulating the query string? It will make your site more useable. Preventing them from doing this will make your site less usable. –  Adam Ralph Dec 2 '11 at 9:21

1 Answer 1

Sending sensitive data in the querystring is not a good idea. If you have to then better to encrypt the data before building your querystring rather than encrypting the whole querystring. Also your site should not be compromised by a user changing the querystring. URI takes a user to where he wants to go so navigating by changing your querystring (URI) is a standard for the web. The web should be RestFul.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for ReSTful... –  Igor Pashchuk Dec 2 '11 at 18:07

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