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I made an extension method to find the number of consecutive values in a collection. Because it is generic, I allow the caller to define the "incrementor" which is a Func<> that is supposed to increment the value in order to check for the existence of a "next" value.

However, if the caller passes an improper incrementor (i.e. x => x), it will cause an infinite recursive loop. Any suggestions on a clean way to prevent this?

public static int CountConsecutive<T>(this IEnumerable<T> values, T startValue, Func<T, T> incrementor)
{
    if (values == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("values");
    }
    if (incrementor == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("incrementor");
    }
    var nextValue = incrementor(startValue);
    return values.Contains(nextValue)
        ? values.CountConsecutive(nextValue, incrementor) + 1
        : 1;
}
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2  
The simple solution is to assume that the person writing the caller is sane. Sometimes you just have to blame the person above you. However, this is an interesting question, so I'd like to see what other people can bring to the table. –  Polynomial Dec 1 '11 at 20:27
1  
Halting problem? –  Austin Salonen Dec 1 '11 at 20:30
    
If your IEnumerable is large and contiguous (given incrementor), this is susceptible to StackOverflowExceptions. –  Austin Salonen Dec 1 '11 at 20:45
    
Thanks Austin for the stack overflow warning. I realized this was not a good use of recursion. –  user718642 Dec 2 '11 at 11:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In the purest sense, this is an attempt at the Halting Problem and is undecidable. For all but the simplest cases, you'll have to trust those calling your method.

Like others have shown, you can do a simple check of equality to show that the next value is different. Storing every visited T will work but you'll have to worry about memory eventually.

As an aside, here's an easily implemented StackOverflowException so you have to be wary of any data set that will have a lot on consecutive values.

var x = Enumerable.Range(1, 100000).CountConsecutive(1, x => x+1);
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Is the stack overflow caused by the depth of the recursion? –  user718642 Dec 1 '11 at 21:31
    
Yes. In the example, they are all consecutive given x => x+1 and this will overflow around 77K (on my machine). –  Austin Salonen Dec 1 '11 at 21:40

To deal with the simplest case, you can do this:

var nextValue = incrementor(startValue);
if (nextValue.Equals(startValue)) {
    throw new ArgumentException("incrementor");
}

For general case, do this:

public static int CountConsecutive<T>(this IEnumerable<T> values, T startValue, Func<T, T> incrementor) {
    if (values == null) {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("values");
    }
    if (incrementor == null) {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("incrementor");
    }
    ISet<T> seen = new HashSet<T>();
    return CountConsecutive(values, startValue, incrementor, seen);
}

private static int CountConsecutive<T>(IEnumerable<T> values, T startValue, Func<T, T> incrementor, ISet<T> seen) {
    if (!seen.Add(startValue)) {
        throw new ArgumentException("incrementor");
    }
    var nextValue = incrementor(startValue);
    return values.Contains(nextValue)
        ? values.CountConsecutive(nextValue, incrementor) + 1
        : 1;
}
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1  
+1: given that incrementor is defined as Func<T,T>, it would hardly make sense if it returned the same value. Unless of course it keeps some kind of static internal call count and is made to return something like 1,1,2,2,3,3 but I would be surprised if supporting such an incrementor were required. It seems reasonable to require that incrementor(x) != x and also for it to be acyclical. –  Adam Ralph Dec 1 '11 at 20:36

You can compare nextValue to startValue (you'll need T to implement IComparable).

This will solve this bug, it won't solve a nasty incrementor bug that returns a loop - a1, a2, a3, ..., an, a1. I don't think you want to handle this case, though

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1  
no need to implement IComparable - all you need is equality –  Adam Ralph Dec 1 '11 at 20:34

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