Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm dealing with jquery selector. I have a portion of html that (simplified) looks like

<div class="tile">            
      message
      <a href="#" class="ui-icon ui-icon-pencil">link1</a>
      <a href="#" class="ui-icon ui-icon-close">linkb</a>    
</div>

this div is repeated severl times in the page

and in the relative javascript I want to add the code to show or hide the 2 links when the user pass the mouse over the "tile" div. I wrote something like

$(function () {
    $(".tile").bind("mouseover", function () {
        $("this .ui-icon").show();
    });
    $(".tile").bind("mouseout", function () {
        $("this .ui-icon").hide();
    });
});

but this doesn't work. Anyone can help me here?

share|improve this question
1  
Check your classes: tile ≠ tileAgenzia. –  GG. Dec 1 '11 at 21:38
    
All the answers have an incredibly common adjustment to your question. I wonder if it will work! –  John Fisher Dec 1 '11 at 21:38
    
@GG: thanks, it was just a typing error while semplifing the code for posting on SO. –  themarcuz Dec 1 '11 at 21:44

10 Answers 10

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Several options:

Minimal fix

You've used "this" within the selector; what you want to do is use $(this) to get a jQuery object for the actual tile the mouse moved over, and then use find to find the descendant elements. You're also better off using mouseenter and mouseleave than mouseover and mouseout:

$(function () {
    $(".tileAgenzia").bind("mouseenter", function () {
        $(this).find(".ui-icon").show();
    });
    $(".tileAgenzia").bind("mouseleave", function () {
        $(this).find(".ui-icon").hide();
    });
});

(The reason you're better off is that mouseover and mouseout bubble, and so as the mouse travels over descendant elements of the "tileAgenzia" elements, you'll see messages from those descendants.)

Use CSS (if you can)

But it's worth noting that unless you have to support IE6 and IE7 (and some people do), you can do this purely with CSS, no JavaScript required:

.tileAgenzia .ui-icon {
    display: none;
}
.tileAgenzia:hover .ui-icon {
    display: inline;
}

When the mouse is hovering anywhere over an element with the class "tileAgenzia", its descendant elements with the class "ui-icon" will be visible; when the mouse isn't hovering over it, they won't.

More concise jQuery

If you want to stick with the JavaScript solution, you can use the hover function, which is (if you pass it two functions) just a shortcut for hooking up mouseenter and mouseleave:

$(function () {
    $(".tileAgenzia").hover(
        // Called on mouseenter
        function () {
            $(this).find(".ui-icon").show();
        },
        // Called on mouseleave
        function () {
            $(this).find(".ui-icon").hide();
        }
    );
});
share|improve this answer
    
I like the CSS solution. Even if a lot of people here give me the most common solution, I'll vote your answer as accepted for the smart alternatives you give. –  themarcuz Dec 1 '11 at 21:49
    
For the more concise answer, throw in my $('.ui-icon', this) and you have a winner! ;) –  John Gibb Dec 1 '11 at 21:53
    
@John: More concise, true, I just hate to be that indirect. But I suppose those who like sausage shouldn't watch it being made (e.g., shouldn't look at the jQuery source). ;-) –  T.J. Crowder Dec 1 '11 at 22:05

Try: $( this ).find ( '.ui icon' ).show()

share|improve this answer

I think you may mean this:

$(this).find(".ui-icon")
share|improve this answer

I believe you wan to change:

$("this .ui-icon")

to

$(this).find(".ui-icon")
share|improve this answer

There are several ways to scope a jQuery select to the current subtree. This is one using the .find() method.

$(function () {
    $(".tileAgenzia").bind("mouseover", function () {
        $(this).find(".ui-icon").show();
    });
    $(".tileAgenzia").bind("mouseout", function () {
        $(this).find(".ui-icon").hide();
    });
});

I might suggest this as a simpler alternative:

$(function () {
    $(".tileAgenzia").hover(function () {
        $(this).find(".ui-icon").toggle();
    });
});
share|improve this answer

this in a string is not the same as the variable this. Wrap it in jQuery and use find.

$(function () {
    $(".tileAgenzia").bind("mouseover", function () {
        $(this).find(".ui-icon").show();
    });
    $(".tileAgenzia").bind("mouseout", function () {
        $(this).find(".ui-icon").hide();
    });
});
share|improve this answer

Ah, "this" shouldn't be inside the apostrophes. If you have jQuery loaded, I would do it the jQuery way:

$(".tile").hover(function(){
  $(this).children(".ui-icon").show();
}, function(){
  $(this).children(".ui-icon").hide();
});
share|improve this answer

To limit your selector to a parent element, use either:

$(this).find(".ui-icon")

Or:

$('.ui-icon', this)
share|improve this answer
    
I'm surprised no-one else has suggested this second syntax. I use it all the time... –  John Gibb Dec 1 '11 at 21:45
    
That's because jQuery internally runs it as $(this).find and personally, the syntax is a little awkward because this is on the wrong side of the selector. –  Dennis Dec 1 '11 at 23:15
$(function () {
    $(".tileAgenzia").bind("mouseover", function () {
        $(this).find(".ui-icon").show();
    });
    $(".tileAgenzia").bind("mouseout", function () {
        $(this).find(".ui-icon").hide();
    });
});
share|improve this answer
$(function () {
    $(".tileAgenzia").bind("mouseover", function () {
        $(this).find(".ui-icon").show();
    });
    $(".tileAgenzia").bind("mouseout", function () {
         $(this).find(".ui-icon").show();
    });
});
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.