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I've run into a problem which seems troubling to me. It seems I've found a situation that's easy enough to work-around, but that could lead to problems if a) I have a lapse in concentration while programming or b) somebody else starts implementing my interfaces and doesn't know how to handle this situation.

Here's my basic setup:

I've got an abstract class that I'm using as a generic interface to several data types. I've adopted the non-virtual public interface paradigm (Sutter, 2001) along with scoped locking to provide some thread safety. An example interface class would look something like this (I've left out details about scoped locking and the mutex implementation, as I don't think they're relevant):

class Foo
{
public:
    A( )
    {
        ScopedLock lock( mutex );
        aImp( );
    }
    B( )
    {
        ScopedLock lock( mutex );
        bImp( );
    }
protected:
    aImp( ) = 0;
    bImp( ) = 0;
}

It is then up to the user to implement aImp and bImp, which is where the problem comes in. If aImp performs some operation which uses bImp, it's extremely easy (and almost logical, in some sense) to do this:

class Bar
{
protected:
    aImp( )
    {
        ...
        B( );
        ...
    }
    bImp( )
    {
        ...
    }
}

Deadlock. Of course, the easy solution to this is to always call the protected virtual functions rather than their public variants (replace B( ) with bImp( ) in the above snippet). But it still seems far to easy to hang myself if I make a mistake, or worse yet allow others to hang themselves.

Does anybody have some way to attempt to either stop an implementer of the abstract class from calling those public functions at compile-time, or otherwise help to avoid the deadlock solution?

Just for kicks, some mutexes allow for operation which will avoid deadlock problems. As an example, if I implement this using the windows functions EnterCriticalSection and LeaveCriticalSection, there's no issue. But I'd rather avoid platform specific functionality. I'm currently using boost::mutex and boost::shared_mutex in my scoped lock implementation, and as far as I've seen it doesn't attempt to avoid deadlock (which I think I almost prefer).

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Another Sutter recommendation: "Avoid calling virtual methods" in "Avoid Calling Unknown Code While Inside a Critical Section"(ddj.com/architect/202802983). –  Éric Malenfant May 7 '09 at 15:08
    
Thanks for the link. I'll be giving this a read now. –  Perculator May 7 '09 at 16:00
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Using private inheritance will potentially solve your problem:

class Foo
{
public:
  void A( )
    {
      ScopedLock lock( mutex );
      aImp( );
    }
  void B( )
    {
      ScopedLock lock( mutex );
      bImp( );
    }

protected:
  virtual void aImp( ) = 0;
  virtual void bImp( ) = 0;
};

class FooMiddle : private Foo
{
public:
  using Foo::aImp;
  using Foo::bImp;
};

class Bar : public FooMiddle
{
  virtual void aImpl ()
  {
    bImp ();
    B ();                   // Compile error - B is private
  }
};

Deriving from Foo privately, and then using FooMiddle ensures that Bar doesn't have access to A or B. However, bar is still able to override aImp and bImp, and the using declarations in FooMiddle mean that these can still be called from Bar.

Alternatively, an option that will help but not solve the problem is to use the Pimpl pattern. You'd end up with something as follows:

class FooImpl
{
public:
  virtual void aImp( ) = 0;
  virtual void bImp( ) = 0;
};

class Foo
{
public:
  void A( )
    {
      ScopedLock lock( mutex );
      m_impl->aImp( );
    }
  void B( )
    {
      ScopedLock lock( mutex );
      m_impl->bImp( );
    }

private:
  FooImpl * m_impl;
}

The benefit is that in the classes deriving from FooImpl, they no longer have a "Foo" object and so cannot easily call "A" or "B".

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2  
I think the version using the pimpl pattern is clearer. There is a good separation of concerns: class Foo is responsible for the client interface and locking, while FooImpl and derived classes deal with the algorithm for A() and B(). The key thing is to keep the declarations for Foo and FooImpl in separate header files (the header for class Foo just needs a forward declaration of class FooImpl). Client code using Foo doesn't know about FooImpl, and code implementing a class derived from FooImpl has know need to know the class Foo even exists. –  Stephen C. Steel May 7 '09 at 14:46
    
Agreed, I think pimpl looks like the way to go. Although both suggestions solve the problem in a manner that's appealing to me. Helps save me from shooting myself in the foot over and over again. –  Perculator May 7 '09 at 16:04
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Your mutex must not be a recursive mutex. If its not a recursive mutex, a second attempt to lock the mutex in the same thread will result in that thread blocking. Since that thread locked the mutex, but is blocked on that mutex, you have a deadlock.

You probably want to look at:

boost::recursive_mutex

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_32_0/doc/html/recursive_mutex.html

It's supposed to implement recursive mutex behavior cross platform.Note Win32 CRITICAL_SECTION's (used via Enter/LeaveCriticalSection) are recursive, which would create the behavior you describe.

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I didn't know the terminology for that type of lock, so your response helped. As somebody mentioned below, using a recursive lock seems like the easy way out, so I probably won't be using this. But it was a helpful answer. –  Perculator May 7 '09 at 16:02
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While a recursive lock would solve your problem, I've always felt that, while sometimes necessary, in many situations a recursive lock is used as an easy way out, locking way too much.

Your posted code is obviously simplified for demonstration purposes, so I'm not sure if it'll apply.

As an example, let's say using resource X is not threadsafe. You've got something like.

A() {
   ScopedLock
   use(x)
   aImp()
   use(x)
}

aImp() {
   ScopedLock
   use(x)
}

Obviously, this would result in a deadlock.

Using your locks much narrower however, would eliminate the problem. Using locks in an as small scope as possible is always a good idea, both for performance reasons, as deadlock avoidance.

A() {
   {
      ScopedLock
      use(x)
   }
   aImp()
   {
      ScopedLock
      use(x)
   }
}

You get the idea.

I'm aware this is not always possible (or would lead to horribly innefficient code), without knowing more details I don't know if it applies to your problem. But thought it was worth posting anyway.

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