Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following tables:

create temporary table Items (item_id int, item_name varchar(10));
create temporary table ItemRating (item_id int, rating int);

With the following data:

insert into Items (item_id, item_name) values (1,'Item 1'),(2,'Item 2'),(3,'Item 3'),(4,'Item 4'),(5,'Item 5');
insert into ItemRating values (1,9),(1,6),(3,10);

And I run the following query:

select i.item_id, i.item_name, avg(ir.rating) from Items i left join ItemRating ir ON ir.item_id = i.item_id group by ir.item_id;

This is the result I get:

+---------+-----------+----------------+
| item_id | item_name | avg(ir.rating) |
+---------+-----------+----------------+
|       2 | Item 2    |           NULL |
|       1 | Item 1    |         7.5000 |
|       3 | Item 3    |        10.0000 |
+---------+-----------+----------------+

Now, I fully understand that the query is written wrong, what I want is to be doing a group by on i.item_id. But I don't understand the behavior. Why does MYSQL display item_id 2 in the results, but not 4 or 5? I would actually expect to see only items 1 & 3 because they're the only ones with a corresponding record in ItemRating.

So, can anyone explain to me what MYSQL is doing here?

share|improve this question
    
Just for sanity can you check your Items table def has five items in it? –  Dave Walker Dec 1 '11 at 21:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's what's going on. Consider the query piece by piece and what MySQL is processing as it goes.

First, you're selecting from items (select i.item_id, i.item_name, avg(ir.rating) from Items i):

+---------+-----------+
| item_id | item_name |
+---------+-----------+
|       1 | Item 1    |
|       1 | Item 1    |
|       2 | Item 2    |
|       3 | Item 3    |
|       4 | Item 4    |
|       5 | Item 5    |
+---------+-----------+

Then you are left joining the ratings (left join ItemRating ir ON ir.item_id = i.item_id):

+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+
| item_id | item_name | ir.rating | ir.item_id |
+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+
|       1 | Item 1    |         9 |          1 |
|       1 | Item 1    |         6 |          1 |
|       2 | Item 2    |      NULL |       NULL |
|       3 | Item 3    |        10 |          3 |
|       4 | Item 4    |      NULL |       NULL |
|       5 | Item 5    |      NULL |       NULL |
+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+

Finally, you are grouping by rating (group by ir.item_id). This will return one row for each unique ir.item_id. There are three unique ir.item_ids (as you can see in the last column there): 1, and NULL, and 3. For each of these, it returns one row and averages the rating.

So, for 1 we have:

+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+
| item_id | item_name | ir.rating | ir.item_id |
+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+
|       1 | Item 1    |         9 |          1 |
|       1 | Item 1    |         6 |          1 |
+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+

Which collapses into:

+---------+-----------+----------------+------------+
| item_id | item_name | avg(ir.rating) | ir.item_id |
+---------+-----------+----------------+------------+
|       1 | Item 1    |            7.5 |          1 |
+---------+-----------+----------------+------------+

For NULL we have:

+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+
| item_id | item_name | ir.rating | ir.item_id |
+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+
|       2 | Item 2    |      NULL |       NULL |
|       4 | Item 4    |      NULL |       NULL |
|       5 | Item 5    |      NULL |       NULL |
+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+

Which collapses into:

+---------+-----------+----------------+------------+
| item_id | item_name | avg(ir.rating) | ir.item_id |
+---------+-----------+----------------+------------+
|        2| Item 2    |           NULL |       NULL |
+---------+-----------+----------------+------------+

For 3 we have:

+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+
| item_id | item_name | ir.rating | ir.item_id |
+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+
|       3 | Item 3    |        10 |          3 |
+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+

Which collapses into:

+---------+-----------+----------------+------------+
| item_id | item_name | avg(ir.rating) | ir.item_id |
+---------+-----------+----------------+------------+
|       3 | Item 3    |             10 |          3 |
+---------+-----------+----------------+------------+

Combining the three collapsed results gives:

+---------+-----------+----------------+------------+
| item_id | item_name | avg(ir.rating) | ir.item_id |
+---------+-----------+----------------+------------+
|       1 | Item 1    |            7.5 |          1 |
|       3 | Item 3    |             10 |          3 |
|       2 | Item 2    |           NULL |       NULL |
+---------+-----------+----------------+------------+

Which is what you got.

The one tricky part is the way the NULL rows collapsed. Recall, these were the null rows:

+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+
| item_id | item_name | ir.rating | ir.item_id |
+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+
|       2 | Item 2    |      NULL |       NULL |
|       4 | Item 4    |      NULL |       NULL |
|       5 | Item 5    |      NULL |       NULL |
+---------+-----------+-----------+------------+

When you do a group by, most database systems will not even let you select columns that are not part of the group. MySQL is an exception. Since you are only grouping on ir.rating, that's the only one most would let you select, because there is no clear way to collapse three rows in a non-aggregate way. What MySQL does is just choose the first one it encounters and use the values in that row as the collapsed value. So (2,4,5) => (2) and (Item 2, Item 4, Item 5) => Item 2 and (NULL, NULL, NULL) => NULL. That's why you only see row 2 (you are actually seeing three collapsed rows that look like row 2).

To really see this in action and drive the point home, consider this query:

select group_concat(i.item_id), group_concat(i.item_name), avg(ir.rating) from Items i left join ItemRating ir ON ir.item_id = i.item_id group by ir.item_id;

This is just like your original query except all three selected columns now have group aggregate functions. I am using GROUP_CONCAT, which just concatenates strings to form the collapsed version (this would be valid in other SQL systems besides MySQL). That returns this:

+-------------------------+---------------------------+----------------+
| group_concat(i.item_id) | group_concat(i.item_name) | avg(ir.rating) |
+-------------------------+---------------------------+----------------+
| 2,4,5                   | Item 2,Item 4,Item 5      |           NULL |
| 1,1                     | Item 1,Item 1             |         7.5000 |
| 3                       | Item 3                    |        10.0000 |
+-------------------------+---------------------------+----------------+
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the very detailed explanation! This makes total sense, I don't know why I wasn't seeing it. Sometimes you just need someone to point out the obvious. :) –  John Dec 1 '11 at 21:55

Here's your resultset after the join and before the group by

+---------+-----------+----------------+-----------+
| i.item_id | i.item_name | ir.rating | ir.item_id |
+---------+-----------+----------------+-----------+
|       1   | Item 1      |         9 | 1          |
|       1   | Item 1      |         6 | 1          |
|       2   | Item 2      |      null | null       |
|       3   | Item 3      |        10 | 3          |
|       4   | Item 4      |      null | null       |
|       5   | Item 5      |      null | null       |
+---------+-----------+----------------+-----------+

You're grouping by the ir.item_id column which has only 3 distinct values... 1,3 and null.

Apparently its taking the first item_name though I doubt its documented what it is doing so this can't be relied on. Bottom line is it should be throwing an error.

What you really want is group by i.item_id, i.item_name

share|improve this answer
    
Ahhh, of course. That makes total sense, for some reason I just wasn't seeing it. Thanks! –  John Dec 1 '11 at 21:54
    
This is kind of a pedantic point, but it actually is documented what it is doing, but it is explicitly documented as indeterminate. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/group-by-extensions.html "MySQL extends the use of GROUP BY so that the select list can refer to nonaggregated columns not named in the GROUP BY clause ... The server is free to choose any value from each group, so unless they are the same, the values chosen are indeterminate." You're still right that it can't be relied on for that reason, just wanted to point out that there are some docs on this. –  Ben Lee Sep 5 at 16:19

The left join brings all the values but you group on the item_id form the ItemRating table so you only get the 3 values there

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.