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In a Windows batch file, I am taking an optional parameter that allows the caller to jump to the middle of the batch file and resume from there.

For example:

if [%1] neq [] (
echo Starting from step %1
goto %1
if %errorlevel% neq 0 goto error
)

:step1

:step2

...

goto end
:error
echo Error handler
...

:end

If the supplied parameter is not a valid label, the batch file immediately exits with the error The system cannot find the batch label specified.

Is there any way for me to handle this error and either execute my error handler block, or resume execution of the entire batch file, as if no parameter had been supplied?

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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You could try using findstr on the batch locating the goto target:

findstr /r /i /c:"^:%1" %0>nul
if errorlevel 1 goto error

It's a bit of a hack, but should work.

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3  
self-parsing batch files! neat. –  Anonymous May 7 '09 at 14:37
    
Coding With Style: If the batch file's name includes spaces, then %0 already contains quotes (otherwise you couldn't have run the batch in the first place). With %~0 you're just stripping the quotes and re-adding them. –  Јοеу Oct 17 '09 at 9:07
    
Huh, learn something new every day. That's completely nonstandard behavior, but I can see why they did that. –  Coding With Style Oct 19 '09 at 5:45
    
Actually, the label doesn't have to start at the beginning of the line. It can be preceded by any number of <space> <tab> , ; or = characters, although I've only ever used spaces. So safer to use findstr /r /i /c:"^[<space>]*:%1" %0>nul. Or to be really complete, use findstr /r /i /c:"^[<space><tab>,;=]*:%1" %0>nul. –  dbenham Mar 21 '12 at 11:19
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call :label spits out the error doesn't spit out an error when stderr is redirected (thanks, Johannes), and doesn't appear to change the error level, but continues with the batch file. You could set a variable after a label to indicate whether execution got that far.

@echo off
call :foo 2>nul
echo %errorlevel%
:bar
echo bar

yields

C:\>test.cmd
The system cannot find the batch label specified - foo
1
bar
C:\>
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2  
You can use 2>nul after the call to suppress the error message output. –  Јοеу May 7 '09 at 15:23
    
Ah, thanks. I tried >nul, and it didn't do a thing. –  Anonymous May 7 '09 at 15:31
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I probably would do it like this.

ECHO Starting from %1
IF "%1" == "step1" GOTO :step1 
IF "%1" == "step2" GOTO :step2
IF "%1" == "step3" GOTO :step3
IF "%1" == "step4" GOTO :step4
ECHO %1 is not valid label name
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I don't think that Windows batch files support any error handling (except if errorlevel...). You will need to validate the passed value is a valid label before the goto.

If at all possible I would recommend using PowerShell which is a far richer language and includes exception based error handling.

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