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I am trying to import a shared library which contains a number of Python wrappers for a visualisation program (VisIt to be specific). This library is implemented in such a way that one first imports the library, which makes a few functions available, and then you call a function which launches the visualisaion viewer and makes the rest of the API available to call. For example, in the following

form visit import *
print dir()
Launch()
print dir()

the first print statement contains the usual builtins and a couple of other functions

['AddArgument', 'GetDebugLevel', 'Launch', 'SetDebugLevel', '__builtins__', '__doc__', '__file__', '__name__', '__package__', '__warningregistry__']

and the second print yields

['ActivateDatabase', 'AddArgument', 'AddColorTable', 'AddOperator', 'AddPlot', ... ]

etc.

I wish to instead call Launch within a function (so I can process and pass arguments to Launch). However, when I do this the functions which are made available after the call to Launch are not in the global namespace, but in the namespace local to the function. So in the following example

import sys
from visit import *

def main():

    Launch()
    print dir()
    if "Version" in dir()
        print Version() # This is made available by call to Launch() above

    return 0

if __name__=="__main__":
    ret = main()
    print dir()
    sys.exit(ret)

the print statement within main will print

['ActivateDatabase', 'AddArgument', 'AddColorTable', 'AddOperator', 'AddPlot', ... ]

as above, whereas the print just after main is called prints

['AddArgument', 'GetDebugLevel', 'Launch', 'SetDebugLevel', '__builtins__', '__doc__', '__file__', '__name__', '__package__', '__warningregistry__']

as if Launch was never called.

My first question is how do I ensure that the global namespace is populated by the call to Launch?

Secondly, the call to Version actually fails, with the error

NameError: global name 'Version' is not defined

even though print "Version" in dir() returns True. Will this problem be resolved if I solve my first problem, or is this something else entirely?

Please let me know if you need more information above the shared library. I don't know a lot about how it is written but I can try and find out.

Edit: Following the answer by @voithos the following is the solution I have adopted.

As stated by @voithos, "Visit uses a dynamic import which brings everything to local scope... assuming that you'll never call visit.Launch() outside of the global scope." His (initial) answer allows me to make the functions made available by visit.Launch() to be used outside (and in) of my main routine, using the prefix visit. with all these routines.

To import the VisIt routines as from visit import *, so that they may be called without the visit. prefix I modify @voithos' use of setattr in main to the following

# Loop through the local namespace and add the names that were just
# imported to the module namespace
loc = locals()
for key in loc:
    setattr(sys.modules[__name__], key, loc[key])

then the VisIt routines are available at the module level and all seems well.

Thanks to @voithos for your answer.

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I initially posted my edit as an answer, but feel that it would be better to include it as an update to my question. –  Chris Dec 5 '11 at 10:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It seems that Visit uses a dynamic import which brings everything to local scope. Basically, they're assuming that you'll never call visit.Launch() outside of the global scope. The launch function is all written in C++, so I'm not sure exactly how it's importing.

One workaround is to reassign the names from the local scope into another scope. (e.g. into the visit module that you import) Here's an example:

import sys
import visit

def main():
    visit.Launch()

    # Loop through the locals that were just imported
    # and assign the names to the visit module
    loc = locals()
    for key in loc:
        setattr(visit, key, loc[key])

    return 0

if __name__=="__main__":
    ret = main()
    print dir(visit)
    sys.exit(ret)

If you'd like to assign the names to the global scope, then you can modify the loop to:

loc = locals()
glob = globals()

for key in loc:
    glob[key] = loc[key]

A note of caution, however: doing this will overwrite any conflicting symbol names that you had defined before. For example, if you had defined a Version() function, the Version() from the Visit module will overwrite the older one that you defined. Hence, it's generally a good idea not to clutter the global scope with names unless you really need to.

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Thanks for this answer @voithos - this works well and visit.Version, for example, can now be called successfully both within main and after main is called. However, can I use a similar work around to add the names local to main to the global namespace. This is important if I want to use the same script with VisIt and within a standard Python interpreter. –  Chris Dec 2 '11 at 9:38
    
@Chris: Sure, that's easy enough. Just assign to the global module instead of to visit. You can use globals() to access the global symbol table. I've modified the answer to show an example. –  voithos Dec 2 '11 at 17:53

I've never used VisIt, but according to their documentation you need to do:

import visit

def main():    
    visit.Launch()

which will import all the functions into 'visit' namespace. Then you simply interface with the library's function via the visit namespace. As in:

visit.Version()
share|improve this answer
    
This gives me the same problem: If I use import visit and replace the print statement after main is called with print dir(visit) then I don't get the full API, only the functions which are initially available before Launch is called. –  Chris Dec 1 '11 at 22:28
    
I should say that there is a reason why I am using from visit import * rather than import visit. My problem is that the functions made available by visit.Launch aren't accessible outside of main. –  Chris Dec 1 '11 at 22:30

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