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Given a floating point number, help me write a function that generates a number with a modified hundredth of a decimal place.

For example:

4.32 => 4.38
5.10 => 5.11
8.37 => 8.31

The following are NOT following

4.32 => 4.29
9.99 => 10.00
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1  
Why the down vote? This is a perfectly legitimate question asking for help writing a function. I'm brain farting. –  Mike Dec 1 '11 at 22:09
    
Not my downvote, but perhaps adding in your attempt at coding this would help. Some people like to see some indication that you tried yourself first and aren't just asking for someone to do it for you. –  James Montagne Dec 1 '11 at 22:10
1  
@Mike Downvotes are often unjustified and never commented sadly. –  GG. Dec 1 '11 at 22:11
    
Gee, you would think with 3.1k rep, people like that would realize I know the etiquette around here. –  Mike Dec 1 '11 at 22:13
    
How is the counterexample of 4.32 => 4.29 not ok? It's still the same integer, right? –  maerics Dec 1 '11 at 22:19

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this:

function simNumber(num) {
    return Math.floor((Math.floor(num * 10) + Math.random()) * 10) / 100;
}
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Boom. Perfect, thank you! –  Mike Dec 1 '11 at 22:30
    
This is good except it can return the same number, which might be ok with you. See my answer which adds rejection sampling to ensure the number is different. –  maerics Dec 1 '11 at 22:31
    
posted same comment as maerics - so removed –  Noel Walters Dec 1 '11 at 22:35

Updated:

http://jsfiddle.net/RHy5d/1/

var num = 3.21;

var newNum = (Math.floor(num*10) + Math.random())/10;

var newNumRounded = Math.floor(newNum*100)/100;
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I think you should change Math.round for Math.floor too, because it would break for Math.random() >= 0.995 –  rabusmar Dec 1 '11 at 22:18
function similar(num) {
    var result = num;
    while (result == num) {
        result = parseFloat(
            num.toFixed(2).substring(0,3) + 
            Math.random().toString().substr(2,1)
        );
    }
    return result;
}

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/n3dst4/8KLFa/

share|improve this answer
    
I think you meant "result = parseFloat(..." not return. –  Noel Walters Dec 1 '11 at 22:41
1  
@NoelWalters * innocent whistle * –  N3dst4 Dec 1 '11 at 22:44

This function replaces the digit in the hundredths place with a random digit [0,9] and then does rejection sampling in case it picked the same number. Should work ok:

function randomHundredths(x) {
  var r, y;
  do {
    r = Math.floor(Math.random() * 10); // [0, 9]
    y = Number(x.toFixed(2).replace(/\d$/, r));
  } while (y == x);
  return y;
}
share|improve this answer

This works:

function simNumber(num) {
    return parseFloat(num.toString() + Math.random().toString().substr(2,1));
}

A demo: http://jsfiddle.net/2QNqw/

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What if the starting number is to 2 decimal places, as in the examples? –  James Montagne Dec 1 '11 at 22:29
    
@James Montagne: Add num.toString().length . –  GG. Dec 1 '11 at 22:30

This should do the trick

function simNumber(num){
    return Math.floor(num) + Math.random()
}

It's worth noting however that the random function won't necessarily return a value to two decimal places.

Clarification: Math.random() return > 0 and < 1

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2  
This could also change the tenths digit. Asker wants the same tenths digit, only changing on the hundredths level. –  Wiseguy Dec 1 '11 at 22:18
    
@Wiseguy Precisely. –  Mike Dec 1 '11 at 22:21
    
According to the w3c website random will return a value between > 0 and < 1. –  SOliver Dec 1 '11 at 22:27
1  
@SOliver Correct, but that's not what he wants. If random number is 0.5, then 9.99 + 0.5 == 10.49, which is not a valid result. The result should start with 9.9 and have a random hundredths digit. –  Wiseguy Dec 1 '11 at 22:30

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