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I am writing a perl script for homework that takes in any files that start with "class" and print out the class title and the average of each student in the file.

INPUT:

$cat class1
Sam 90, 95, 82
Max 88, 90, 86
Alex 85, 92, 90
$cat class2
Student1 87, 91, 86
Student2 84, 89, 88
Student3 84, 90, 93

OUTPUT:

*****class1*****
Sam: 89
Max: 88
Alex: 89
*****class2*****
Student1: 88
Student2: 87
Student3: 89

Current Attempt at script:

#!/usr/bin/perl

@gradefiles = <class*>;

foreach (@gradefiles){
    print "****".$_."****\n";
    my %grades;
    my %average;
    open(DATA, $_) || die "Can't open $_: $!\n";
    while (<DATA>){
            my ($student, @vals) = split(/\t/);
            $grades{$student} = \@vals;
    }
    keys %grades;
    while(my($k, $v) = each %grades){
            my @igrades = split(',',$v);
            my $total = 0;
            foreach (@igrades){
                    $total += $_;
            }
            my $length = @igrades;
            my $avg = $total / $length;

            $average{$k} = \$avg;
    }

    keys %average;
    while(my($k, $v) = each %average){
            print $k." ".$v."\n";
    }
}

CURRENT OUTPUT:

****class1****
Sam 90, 95, 82
SCALAR(0x2036100)
Alex 85, 92, 90
SCALAR(0x202ab38)
Max 88, 90, 86
SCALAR(0x2034710)
****class2****
Student3 84, 90, 93
SCALAR(0x2034740)
Student2 84, 89, 88
SCALAR(0x2034728)
Student1 87, 91, 86
SCALAR(0x202a298)

=====UPDATE==== my new code

    #!/usr/bin/perl

@gradefiles = <class*>;

foreach (@gradefiles){
    print "****".$_."****\n";
    my %grades;
    my %average;
    open(DATA, $_) || die "Can't open $_: $!\n";
    while (<DATA>){
            my ($student, @vals) = split(/\t/);
            $grades{$student} = @vals;
    }

    for my $name (keys %grades){
            my @igrades = split(',',$grades{$name});
            my $total = 0;
            for my $grade (@igrades){
                    $total += $grade;
            }
            my $length = @igrades;
            my $avg = $total / $length;

            $average{$name} = $avg;
    }

    for my $name (keys %average){
            print $name.": ".$average{$name}."\n";
    }
}

My new output:

****class1****
Sam 90, 95, 82
: 0
Alex 85, 92, 90
: 0
Max 88, 90, 86
: 0
****class2****
Student3 84, 90, 93
: 0
Student2 84, 89, 88
: 0
Student1 87, 91, 86
: 0

WORKING SCRIPT

 #!/usr/bin/perl

@gradefiles = <class*>;

foreach (@gradefiles){
    print "****".$_."****\n";
    my %grades;
    my %average;
    open(DATA, $_) || die "Can't open $_: $!\n";
    while (<DATA>){
            my ($student, $vals) = split(/\t/);
            $grades{$student} = $vals;
    }

    for my $name (keys %grades){
            my @igrades = split(',',$grades{$name});
            my $total = 0;

            for my $grade (@igrades){
                    $total += $grade;
            }
            my $length = @igrades;

            my $avg = $total / $length;

            $average{$name} = $avg;
    }

    for my $name (keys %average){
            print $name.": ".$average{$name}."\n";
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
First of all, always, always, always use strict and use warnings. Every. Time. Also, at a glance, I can tell you that keys %grades does nothing by itself, since you're not doing anything with the keys. Likewise with keys %average. –  Jack Maney Dec 1 '11 at 22:55
2  
Also, why are you storing $average{$k} as a scalar reference--namely a reference to $avg (that's what \$avg is)? Remove that backslash, and try it again. –  Jack Maney Dec 1 '11 at 22:57
    
If I knew why or what I was doing Id be done hahah. I am just piecing this together from different tutorials on different subjects. –  BillPull Dec 1 '11 at 23:00
1  
Take a look at perldoc perlreftut. Most of the time, you'll only need to build references to arrays and hashes (to either make multi-dimensional data structures or to pass complicated data in and out of subroutines). In practice, you'll only need a scalar reference if you want to pass a scalar argument by reference to a subroutine. –  Jack Maney Dec 1 '11 at 23:02
    
I tried implementing some of the examples in the tutorial updated the code example above. –  BillPull Dec 1 '11 at 23:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you're overcomplicating the matter somewhat. You don't need any of the hashes that you're building.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010; # For 'say'

foreach my $class (<class*>) {
  say "****$class****";

  # Three-arg open, lexical filehandle. Modern Perl best practice    
  open my $data, '<', $class or die "Can't open $class: $!\n";

  while (<$data>) {
    my ($student, @data) = split /[\s,]+/;
    say "$student: ", avg(@data);
  }
}

sub avg {
  my $total;
  $total += $_ for @_;

  return $total / @_;
}
share|improve this answer

You're doing this:

$average{$k} = \$avg;

Which stores a reference to the scalar. Thus when you print out $average{$k}, you print out the reference to the scalar, which is SCALAR(0x202a298). Change the line to:

$average{$k} = $avg;

...and everything should work.

share|improve this answer
    
those are exactly the same lines? –  BillPull Dec 1 '11 at 23:02
1  
@BillPull: argh, I was having multiple issues posting this (kept getting 408 errors). It's fixed now. –  CanSpice Dec 1 '11 at 23:03
    
this didnt seem to fix the issue I am no longer getting SCALAR in output also shifted some stuff around...see updates above. –  BillPull Dec 1 '11 at 23:12

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