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I am working on an automation strategy for our QA group and need to be able to capture the output of scripts and EXEs. When I run this code as a Console app, I am able to successfully capture the output of plink.exe:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Process process = new Process();
        process.StartInfo.FileName = @"C:\Tools\plink.exe";
        process.StartInfo.Arguments = @"10.10.9.27 -l root -pw PASSWORD -m C:\test.sh";
        process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
        process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
        process.Start();

        string output = process.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();
        process.WaitForExit();

        output = output.Trim().ToLower(); // Output is successfully captured here

        if (output == "pass")
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Passed!");
        }
    }
}

This command takes about a minute to execute and I successfully capture the results to the output variable.

However, when I compile the same code as a DLL and run through NUnit, the code completes immediately and fails with the value of output == NULL:

[TestFixture]
public class InstallTest
{
    [Test]
    public void InstallAgentNix()
    {
        Process process = new Process();
        process.StartInfo.FileName = @"C:\Tools\plink.exe";
        process.StartInfo.Arguments = @"10.10.9.27 -l root -pw PASSWORD -m C:\test.sh";
        process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
        process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
        process.Start();

        string output = process.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();

        process.WaitForExit();

        output = output.Trim().ToLower();

        Assert.AreEqual("pass", output, "Agent did not get installed");
    }
}

I have narrowed the problem down to the line string output = process.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd(). If I comment the line out, execution time is around a minute and the operation is successfully executed on the remote machine (test.sh gets executed on a remote linux box).

I hope I'm missing something simple - I don't want to have to find a different test harness.

EDIT: Looks similar to the (unsolved) question here: Why does a process started in dll work when tested using console application but not when called by another dll?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok, It took me all night but I figured it out. I have to RedirectStandardInput in addition to redirecting standard output for this to work.

Here is the fixed code that works in a DLL. As an FYI, this fix resolves the problem in a WinForms app as well:

[TestFixture]
public class InstallTest
{
    [Test]
    public void InstallAgentNix()
    {
        Process process = new Process();
        process.StartInfo.FileName = @"C:\Tools\plink.exe";
        process.StartInfo.Arguments = @"10.10.9.27 -l root -pw PASSWORD -m C:\test.sh";
        process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
        process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
        process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardInput = true;
        process.Start();

        string output = process.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();

        process.WaitForExit();

        output = output.Trim().ToLower();

        Assert.AreEqual("pass", output, "Agent did not get installed");
    }
}
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As you found by yourself, adding the line

process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;

solves the problem. NUnit must set up another level of indirection. Thanks for your own answer which saved me from painful investigation.

Although I don't think the issue comes from the difference between dll/exe since I encountered this in a test project compiled as a console application.

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