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I'm fairly new to Android development. I'm wondering what are the different ways that are used to design XML layouts. Ive been using the eclipse drag and drop interface and I've seen http://droiddraw.org/ while doing some searching. Just wondering if there are any other possibly better ways out there to design layouts that professions use because I'm having a hard time with the eclipse interface making complex designs?

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3 Answers 3

First of all check out the android developer site user interface page

http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/ui/index.html

There are basically three different ways you can make an android layout:

XML

http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/ui/declaring-layout.html

You can define a static layout using XML. Perhaps a good way to think of it is a sort of shorthand. It is very easy to declare Views and attributes, and the hierarchical format of XML makes it a bit easier to visualize.

This is a typical layout

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<ViewGroup xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:attribute="value" >

    <ViewGroup android:attribute="value" >

        <View android:attribute="value" />

    </ViewGroup>

    <View android:attribute="value" />

</ViewGroup>

Then you use setContentView(R.layout.layout) in your activity and go about your business.

Java

You can do everything you would do in XML, plus add things like listeners, or do other dynamic things that you cannot in XML. Here is how you might declare a typical layout (ViewGroup is abstract so you would have to use a subclass. The same goes for XML)

ViewGroup parent = new ViewGroup(this);
ViewGroup vg1 = new ViewGroup(this);
View v1 = new View(this);
View v2 = new View(this);

parent.addView(vg1);
vg1.addView(v1);
parent.addView(v2);

v1.setOnAwesomeListener(new AwesomeListener() {
    onAwesome(View v) {
        doDynamicThings();
    }
}

setContentView(parent);

Hybrid

This is the case used most often in my opinion. Declare a layout in XML with an id, like android:id="@+id/v1" then load Views from XML into Java

setContentView(R.layout.layout);

View v1 = findViewById(R.id.v1);

// dynamically change v1
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Thanks, I've been using the Hybrid method and i just have so much trouble making things look right. –  Peter Dec 2 '11 at 1:21
    
Oops, I misunderstood what your question was. Please see my new answer on how I approach layouts using just XML. –  Craigy Dec 2 '11 at 2:38

How to design a layout using XML

So the lack of GUI designer tools has left you no choice but to dive into coding up your layout by hand. Good news is that once you get the hang of it you should be able to tackle any layout you wish. Let's look at the building blocks

ViewGroup

First off you need to choose a ViewGroup to define the structure of the layout, or section of the layout. Remember that these can be nested, so design top-down and try to classify sections of the layout based on the form you want them to have. There are two main options:

As the name implies, useful for arranging items in a line. Choose an orientation, horizontal or vertical, and simply add items. They will be added in top to bottom or left to right ordering.

Useful for placing an item in a specific location on the screen. So if you want to put a button in the top-left, or a bar across the top, this is your ViewGroup.

Layout Parameters

Used for defining the width, height, weight, and other aspects of a view.

There are two options for width and height: fill_parent (replaced with match_parent in API level 8) and wrap_content. The view can choose to either fill the parent view's width, or take only the space it needs.

There is another useful layout parameter, unique to LinearLayout, called weight. It is useful for letting views share space in ratios, or letting one view take the space left over after other views in the LinearLayout take their share.

Example

Let's try to design the layout for Google Maps. Pretend it is a layout that I have in my head, and I want to implement it. Here is a screenshot

enter image description here

I will try to break this down:

Looking at it, there is a bar across the top and a map underneath it. I believe this could be implemented with either a LinearLayout or a RelativeLayout. However, the buttons in the bottom right and left scream RelativeLayout, so I will go with that.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="fill_parent" >

    <TODO:BAR
        android:id="@+id/bar"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_alignParentTop="true">

    </TODO:BAR>

    <MapView
        android:id="@+id/map"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@+id/bar" />

    <ImageButton
        android:id="@+id/latitude"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_alignParentBottom="true"
        android:layout_alignParentLeft="true"
        android:layout_marginBottom="20dp"
        android:layout_marginLeft="20dp" />

    <LinearLayout
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_alignParentBottom="true"
        android:layout_alignParentRight="true"
        android:layout_marginBottom="20dp"
        android:layout_marginRight="20dp"
        android:orientation="vertical" >

        <ImageButton
            android:id="@+id/zoom_in"
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content" />

        <ImageButton
            android:id="@+id/zoom_out"
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content" />
    </LinearLayout>

</RelativeLayout>

Now some explanation. In RelativeLayout you use alignParent[direction] to specify where the view goes. I also wanted some space on the sides, so I used margin[direction] to specify in dp or density-independent pixels. As you can see, wrap_content is used most of the time, so the buttons would acquire the size of the image used on them.

Now everything is defined but the bar at the top. I'm going to break it up into four different Views: The dropdown menu view, the search view, the layers button and the my location button. The way I would like it to work is put the menu at the far left, and the layers and my location buttons on the right, with the search box taking up the remaining space. This sounds like a job for LinearLayout and weight! Here is how I define the bar, which can be inserted into the placeholder above to get the final layout

<LinearLayout
    android:id="@+id/bar"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:layout_alignParentTop="true" >

    <ImageButton
        android:id="@+id/dropdown_menu"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" />

    <EditText
        android:id="@+id/search"
        android:layout_width="0dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_weight="1" />

    <ImageButton
        android:id="@+id/layers"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" />

    <ImageButton
        android:id="@+id/my_location"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" />
</LinearLayout>

Setting the width of the search bar to 0dp means let the other views take what they need, then the weight says take the remaining space.

And there you have it. A recreation of the basic layout for the Google Maps app (minus button images and other niceties like custom views), showing how you might use various layouts and XML fairly painlessly. Hopefully this was useful.

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The tool chain is a little weak in this area. I don't really care for DroidDraw, and the Eclipse GUI editor is not very good for anything more than simple layouts. It often renders RelativeLayouts incorrectly for example.

Personally I do almost everything directly in XML. You have to understand how all the different Layout classes work to do anything complex anyway. The only real downside to XML is that all of the extra cruft from tags, attributes, etc. makes for a lot of extra stuff to type, but the editor takes care of most of that for you.

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