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A lot of people on SO pointed out that I should use using statement more often. So I am practicing.

The problem is that I can't decide when to use it and when not to use it. When I think I should use it, then I get errors such as in this example (PS. HashPhrase is a class created by me):

        using (HashPhrase hash = new HashPhrase())
        {
            connection.ConnectionString =
                "Provider=Microsoft.ACE.OLEDB.12.0;" +
                "Data Source=" + filePath + ";" +
                "Persist Security Info=False;" +
                "Jet OLEDB:Database Password=" + hash.ShortHash(pass) + ";";
        }

But it gives me an error: 'Password_Manager.HashPhrase': type used in a using statement must be implicitly convertible to 'System.IDisposable'

But in this example it works fine:

    using (OleDbConnection connection = new OleDbConnection())
    {
        connection.ConnectionString =
            "Provider=Microsoft.ACE.OLEDB.12.0;" +
            "Data Source=" + filePath + ";" +
            "Persist Security Info=False;" +
            "Jet OLEDB:Database Password=" + hash.ShortHash(pass) + ";";

        using (OleDbCommand command = new OleDbCommand(sql, connection))
        {
            try
            {
                connection.Open();
                command.ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Error: " + ex.Message);
            }
        }
    }

Are there any quick guidelines how to determine when using statement should be used?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Your question already touches on the answer.

If the type implements the IDisposable interface then you should aim to use using whenever possible (that is, always, unless there's a compelling reason not to).

And if the type doesn't implement IDisposable then you can't use using, and the compiler will tell you so, as you've already discovered.

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That makes sense. –  HelpNeeder Dec 2 '11 at 0:47
1  
@downvoter: Would you care to explain your reasons for the downvote? –  LukeH May 2 '13 at 11:15

In

using (var r = new R())
{
   // use r
}

the class R should implement the IDisposing interface.

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You should use a using statement whenever the class implements the IDisposable interface.

It's a shorthand for wrapping the object in a try-finally block to ensure the object's Dispose method is always called to release any resources, regardless of whether an exception is thrown.

To check, right-click the class name in Visual Studio and select Go To Declaration to open it in the Object Browser. You can then check easily whether the class or its base types implement IDisposable.

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+1 for a reference :) –  HelpNeeder Dec 2 '11 at 0:47

The easiest way is to see if the object implements the IDisposable interface. So, right click the object/class in question, select Go to Definition from the dropdown (or press F12), and see if the class implements IDisposable. Note, in a class that implements many interfaces/other classes, you may need to actually check those classes to see if they implement IDisposable as well.

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