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Can anyone tell me if I'm right or not? I have two thread which will run in parallel.

class MyThread extends Thread {

    MyThread() {
    }

    method1() {
    }

    method2() {
    }

    method3() {
    }

    approach(1):

        run() {
            method1();
            method2();
            method3();
        }

    approach(2):

        run() {
            //the code of method1 is here (no method calling)
            //the code of method2 is here (no method calling)
            //the code of method3 is here (no method calling)
        }

}

class Test{
    public static void main(){
        Thread t1 = new Thread();
        t1.start();
        Thread t2 = new Thread();
        t2.start();
    }
}

method1, method2 and method3 don't access global shared data but their codes perform some write in local variable within the method section, thus I guess I can not allow overlap execution within the method section.

Thereby: in approach(1): I need to make the methods (method1, method2 and method3) synchronized, right?

in approach(2): No need to synchronize the code sections, right?

If I'm right in both approach, using the approach(2) will give better performance, right?

share|improve this question
    
Please indent your code with four spaces so that it will be formatted as code. – Taymon Dec 2 '11 at 4:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are saying your methods don't access global shared data and write only local variables so there is no need to synchronize them Because both the threads will be having their own copies of local variables. They will not overlap or something.

This kind of problem is faced in case of static/class variables. If multiple threads try to change the value of static variables at same time then there comes the problem so there we need to synchronize.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok both threads will be having their own copies of local variables if there is no method calling, right? – mazen Dec 2 '11 at 5:06
    
even in case of method calling too, they will have their own copies of local variables. – gprathour Dec 2 '11 at 5:10
    
ok and what about if some variables are data members of this class? – mazen Dec 2 '11 at 5:15
    
Those are called Instance variables because you will need instance of class to access them And EVEN each instance of class will be having its own copy of instance variables. – gprathour Dec 2 '11 at 5:19
    
So I can say that each thread will have its own copy of method1,method2 and method3? right? – mazen Dec 2 '11 at 5:27

Short answer: you don't need the synchronization. Both approaches are equivalent from a thread safety perspective.

Longer answer:

It may be worthwhile taking a step back and remembering what the synchronized block does. It does essentially two things:

  1. makes sure that if thread A is inside a block that's synchronized on object M, no other thread can enter a block that's synchronized on the same object M until thread A is done with its block of code
  2. makes sure that if thread A has done work within a block that's synchronized object M, and then finishes that block, and then thread B enters a block that's also synchronized on M, then thread B will see everything that thread A had done within its synchronized block. This is called establishing the happens-before relationship.

Note that a synchronized method is just shorthand for wrapping the method's code in synchronized (this) { ... }.

In addition to those two things, the Java Memory Model (JMM) guarantees that within one thread, things will happen as if they had not been reordered. (They may actually be reordered for various reasons, including efficiency -- but not in a way that your program can notice within a single thread. For instance, if you do "x = 1; y = 2" the compiler is free to switch that such that y = 2 happens before x = 1, since a single thread can't actually notice the difference. If multiple threads are accessing x and y, then it's very possible, without proper synchronization, for another thread to see y = 2 before it sees x = 1.)

So, getting back to your original question, there are a couple interesting notes.

First, since a synchronized method is shorthand for putting the whole method inside a "synchronized (this) { ... }" block, t1's methods and t2's methods will not be synchronized against the same reference, and thus will not be synchronized relative to each other. t1's methods will only be synchronized against the t1 object, and t2's will only be synchronized against t2. In other words, it would be perfectly fine for t1.method1() and t2.method1() to run at the same time. So, of those two things the synchronized keyword provides, the first one (the exclusivity of entering the block) isn't relevant. Things could go something like:

  1. t1 wants to enter method1. It needs to acquire the t1 monitor, which is not contended -- so it acquires it and enters the block
  2. t2. wants to enter method2. It needs to acquire the 11 monitor, which is not contended -- s it acquires it and enters the block
  3. t1 finishes method1 and releases its hold on the t1 monitor
  4. t2 finishes method1 and releases its hold on the t2 monitor

As for the second thing synchronization does (establishing happens-before), making method1() and method2() synchronized will basically be ensuring that t1.method1() happens-before t1.method2(). But since both of those happen on the same thread anyway (the t1 thread), the JMM anyway guarantees that this will happen.

So it actually gets even a bit uglier. If t1 and t2 did share state -- that is, synchronization would be necessary -- then making the methods synchronized would not be enough. Remember, a synchronized method means synchronized (this) { ... }, so t1's methods would be synchronized against t1, and t2's would be against t2. You actually wouldn't be establishing any happens-before relationship between t1's methods and t2's.

Instead, you'd have to ensure that the methods are synchronized on the same reference. There are various ways to do this, but basically, it has to be a reference to an object that the two threads both know about.

Assume t1 and t2 both know about the same reference, LOCK. Both have methods like:

method1() {
    synchronized(LOCK) {
        // do whatever
    }
}

Now things could go something like this:

  1. t1 wants to enter method1. It needs to acquire the LOCK monitor, which is not contended -- so it acquires it and enters the block
  2. t2 wants to enter method1. It needs to acquire the LOCK monitor, which is already held by t1 -- so t2 is put on hold.
  3. t1 finishes method1 and releases its hold on the LOCK monitor
  4. t2 is now able to acquire the LOCK monitor, so it does, and starts on the meat of method1
  5. t2 finishes method1 and releases its hold on the LOCK monitor
share|improve this answer

If the methods you're calling don't write to global shared data, you don't have to synchronize them.

In a multithreaded program, each thread has its own call stack. The local variables of each method will be separate in each thread, and will not overwrite one another.

Therefore, approach 1 works fine, does not require synchronization overhead, and is much better programming practice because it avoids duplicated code.

share|improve this answer
    
So I can say that each thread will have its own copy of method1,method2 and method3 right? – mazen Dec 2 '11 at 5:25
    
@mazen Yes, they will. – Taymon Dec 2 '11 at 5:34
    
Thanks you for yr confirmation! – mazen Dec 2 '11 at 17:10

Thread-wise your ok. local variables within methods are not shared between threads as each instance running in a thread will have its own stack.

You won't have any speed improvements between the two approaches it is just a better organisation of the code (shorter methods are easier to understand)

If each method is independent of the other you may want to consider if they belong in the same class. If you want the performance gain create 3 different classes and execute multiple threads for each method (performance gains depends on the number of available cores cpu/io ration etc.)

share|improve this answer
    
yes methods are independent of each other but they belong to the same class, so they need to be synchronized right? – mazen Dec 2 '11 at 5:12
    
They need to be synchronized if they are touching a shared resource which isn't in itself thread safe or the shared resource is thread safe but they try to accomplish a non-atomic goal on that resource. for example if they access 2 synchronized queues and you want to ensure you push to both queues you need to synchronize the methods – Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz Dec 2 '11 at 7:41
    
Thank you I got the idea! – mazen Dec 2 '11 at 17:16

Thereby: in approach(1): I need to make the methods(method1,method2 and method3) synchronized, right? in approach(2): No need to synchronize the code sections, right?

Invoking in-lined methods v/s invoking multiple methods don't determine whether a method should be synchronized or not. I'd recommend you to read this and then ask for more clarifications.

If I'm right in both approach, using the approach(2) will give better performance, right?

At the cost of breaking down methods into a single god method? Sure, but you would be looking at a "very" miniscule improvement as compared to the lost code readability, something definitely not recommended.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, but you didn't understand my question, check the other answers to figure out what I mean, anyway thank you! – mazen Dec 2 '11 at 5:18
    
Nope, I have completely understood your question. My point is that methods have their own call stack frame and so have absolutely got nothing to do with thread safety unless there is some shared state taken into consideration. Your sample snippet doesn't have any shared variables so there is absolutely no question of synchronization. – Sanjay T. Sharma Dec 2 '11 at 5:41
    
Yeh but I didn't know that the methods have their own stack frame thus, nothing to do with thread safety. Thanks you! – mazen Dec 2 '11 at 17:07

method1, 2 and 3 won't be executed concurrently so if the variables that they read/write are not shared outside the class with other threads while they're running then there is no synchronization required and no need to inline.

If they modify data that other threads will read at the same time that they're running then you need to guard access to that data.

If they read data that other threads will write at the same time that they're running then you need to guard access to that data.

If other threads are expected to read data modified by method1, 2, or 3, then you need to make the run method synchronized (or them in a synchronized block) to set up a gate so that the JVM will set up a memory barrier and ensure that other threads can see the data after m1,2 and 3 are done.

share|improve this answer
    
How method1, 2 and 3 won't be executed concurrently? suppose two threads invoke the start method in almost the same time, then the start methods in turn invoke for example method1 – mazen Dec 2 '11 at 5:10
    
Sorry, I was assuming that the runnable was only passed to one thread. If you pass that to multiple threads then yes, you would need to guard access to any shared data that they read or write. – Bill Dec 2 '11 at 5:34
    
No problem, and yes only shared data thank you! – mazen Dec 2 '11 at 17:13

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