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I have a struct that has a element in it denoted as void (*func)(); I know that void pointers are usually used for function pointers but I cannot seem to define the function. I keep getting dereferencing pointer to incomplete type. I googled around but to no avail. Any advice would be appreciated.

I am trying to do this:

struct callback * cb;
cb->func = *readUserInput;

ReadUserInput is defined as:

void readUserInput(void)
{
}

And Callback is defined as such:

struct callback {
    void (*func)();
    int pcount;
    enum attr_type type;
    void *p[0];
 };
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Are you sure you're getting the error where you think you are? Could it be from dereferencing p[i], which is a void *, so you can't dereference it. –  Alok Singhal Dec 2 '11 at 5:47
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2 Answers 2

You need to take the address of the function, not attempt to dereference it.

Change

cb->func = *readUserInput;

to

cb->func = &readUserInput;

Also, you are creating a pointer that has a garbage value and then dereferencing it, causing undefined behaviour. You need to allocate space for it one way or another (malloc/free or just allocate it on the stack):

struct callback cb; // put it on the stack
cb.func = &readUserInput;

or

struct callback * cb = malloc(sizeof(callback));
cb->func = &readUserInput;

...

free(cb);
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struct callback_list * callback_list_new(void) { struct callback_list *ret=g_new0(struct callback_list, 1); return ret; } struct callback * cb = callback_list_new(); cb->func = &readUserInput; I modified it to the above using the provided funtion to initalize the callback struct still to no avail. Any Ideas. Thanks so much for the help –  TJ Pavlu Dec 2 '11 at 5:41
    
@TJPavlu ok then ignore the rest of the answer, just do cb->func = &readUserInput; –  Seth Carnegie Dec 2 '11 at 5:42
    
Ok I think I got it. I typedefed that structure. And then I was able to declare one on the stack as shown. Thanks! –  TJ Pavlu Dec 2 '11 at 5:47
    
Actually, the rules for function names are rather odd. Any expression of function type (such as the function's name) decays to a pointer to the function in most contexts; the exceptions are sizeof func and &func (the former is illegal, the latter yield.s a pointer to the function. So the expressions &readUserInput, readUserInput, *readUserInput, and **readUserInput are all equivalent; they all yield a pointer to the function. (The prefix in a function call is of type pointer-to-function.) –  Keith Thompson Dec 2 '11 at 20:37
    
@KeithThompson I knew about the &func and func being the same, but I didn't know about *func and **func being the same as &func and func, thanks. I guess we'll never know though, seems like the OP abandoned ship. –  Seth Carnegie Dec 2 '11 at 20:41
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You have three problems.

Your syntax when assigning the function pointer is incorrect, and you're not actually defining an instance of struct callback.

You want to say:

struct callback cb;
cb.func = readUserInput;

You could explicitly take the address of the readUserInput function, but it is unnecessary. That syntax would look like:

struct callback cb;
cb.func = &readUserInput;

In standard C, a bare function name will be evaluated as the address of the function.

Finally, your callback has the wrong signature. It's defined as a function taking an unknown number of arguments and returning nothing.

Your declaration in the struct calls for a pointer to a function taking no arguments and returning nothing.

Define the callback function as:

void readUserInput()
{

}

or correct the declaration in the struct as:

struct callback {
    void (*func)(void);
    int pcount;
    enum attr_type type;
    void *p[0];
 };
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Wont compile.... I initially thought it was that as well –  TJ Pavlu Dec 2 '11 at 5:39
    
@gregj: Most C compilers I've encountered will balk at void readUserInput(), so your 2nd suggestion to the 3rd problem is better. –  Joseph Quinsey Dec 2 '11 at 7:46
    
If by "balk" you mean "warn", that's fine. And providing a proper prototype is indeed the best practice. However both are valid standard C, and I provided both options because OP indicated that some of the code wasn't under their control. If the callback function type is set in stone, than the only option is to make the function definition match. –  Greg Jandl Dec 2 '11 at 15:31
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