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Here is the interface I need to define. I could not because generic type parameter in Parameters property does not exist. Is there a way to achieve this kind of interface definition in C#?

UPDATED I did not want to define interface like this: ICriteria<T>.

public interface ICriteria
{
    string Text { get; set; }
    IList<IParameter<T>> Parameters { get; set; }
}

UPDATED

As more detail required why I would not want go that route. Here is more information about it. I have Parameter interface and implementaion like this

public interface IParameter<T>
{
    string Name { get; set; }
    T Value { get; set; }
}

public class Parameter<T> : IParameter<T>
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public T Value { get; set; }
}

And the method consumes above implementation like this

public ICriteria BuildQuery()
    {
        ICriteria criteria = new Criteria();
        criteria.Text = "dbo.Messages";

        var chatRoom = new Parameter<int>() { Name = "ChatRoomId", Value = _chatRoomId };
        var startDate = new Parameter<DateTime>() { Name = "StartDate", Value = _startDateTime };
        var endDate = new Parameter<DateTime>() { Name = "EndDate", Value = _endDateTime };

        //I want to add all parameters to criteria instance
        criteria.Parameters.Add(chatRoom);
        criteria.Parameters.Add(startDate);
        criteria.Parameters.Add(endDate);

        return criteria;
    }

The above method creates different type of parameters and try to add them to Parameters list in ICriteria interface. Hope it make sense.

share|improve this question
3  
Given that the sensible solution is to declare it as ICriteria<T>, you need to give us more information about why you don't want to go down that route. – Jon Skeet Dec 2 '11 at 6:32
    
@JonSkeet updated the question with more details. – Amzath Dec 2 '11 at 6:54
1  
And how does the criteria use the parameters? See my answer - I suspect the last part would work fine for you. Basically you want a non-generic IParameter interface. – Jon Skeet Dec 2 '11 at 6:55
    
@JonSkeet I thought Criteria property implementation would be public IList<IParameter<T>> Parameters{get set code in here}. But it does not work that way. I think my question is wrong and should asked in different way. Let me try your answer. – Amzath Dec 2 '11 at 7:04
up vote 3 down vote accepted

As mentioned, you can't do that. But what you could do is this:

public interface IParameter
{
    // Any members which don't need T
}

public interface IParameter<T> : IParameter
{
    // Any members which do need to refer to T
}

public interface ICriteria
{
    string Text { get; set; }
    IEnumerable<IParameter> WeakParameters { get; }
}

public interface ICriteria<T> : ICriteria
{
    IList<IParameter<T>> StrongParameters { get; }
}

A typical implementation would make the WeakParameters call just return StrongParameters (assuming you're using C# 4 with generic covariance). Another option would be to make the strong form hide the weak form:

// Parameter types as before

public interface ICriteria
{
    string Text { get; set; }
    IEnumerable<IParameter> Parameters { get; }
}

public interface ICriteria<T> : ICriteria
{
    new IList<IParameter<T>> Parameters { get; }
}

Then anything which only had a reference of compile-time type ICriteria would get the "weak" sequence, whereas anything with a reference of compile-time type ICriteria<T> would get the "strong" list.

EDIT: This is all assuming that you want a single T for all parameters on a single ICriteria instance. If that's not the case, then you might want:

// Parameter types as before

public interface ICriteria
{
    string Text { get; set; }
    IList<IParameter> Parameters { get; }
}

You can add any kind of IParameter<T> to it, varying the T with each call, but when you're reading the parameters you don't have the information (at compile-time) about which parameter has which type (or indeed whether the parameter even implements the strongly-typed interface).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Coming from a stronger Java background, it's interesting to see how inheritance/polymorphism is used to work with C#'s stricter and more tangible generics implementation. For example in Java, the OP probably would've fallen back on wildcards for this purpose. – Paul Bellora Dec 2 '11 at 6:52

You would need to declare a type parameter T for your ICriteria interface in order to use it in its body:

public interface ICriteria<T>
{
   string Text { get; set; }
   IList<IParameter<T>> Parameters { get; set; }
}

I think this is what your intention is; please let me know if I misunderstood the question.

share|improve this answer
    
I did not want to define like this ICriteria<T> – Amzath Dec 2 '11 at 6:28
4  
@Amzath - Then there's no way to use T in the interface body - how should the compiler know what it means? – Paul Bellora Dec 2 '11 at 6:29
    
that make sense – Amzath Dec 2 '11 at 6:32
    
I am not sure this correct place to ask. How would I add list of parameters of different types into this interface? – Amzath Dec 2 '11 at 6:34
1  
@Amzath: You wouldn't, because such an operation doesn't make sense when there's a type parameter. It would really help if you'd clarify what you're trying to achieve. – Jon Skeet Dec 2 '11 at 6:38

Maybe you can add constraint for your generic type:

   public interface ICriteria<T,S>
        where T : IParameter<S>
    {
        string Text { get; set; }
        IList<T> Parameters { get; set; }
    }
share|improve this answer

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