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My environment is in Linux, using pthreads, compiled in gcc.

I have 3 threads as socket threads which receive socket data, about 1500 rows per second for thread1 and thread2, thread3 will receive 400 rows per second, in thread1, thread2, thread3, I use mutex_lock to protect global vars, so that thread4 get these global vars would be correct, of course thread4 use mutex_lock, too.

Thread1:

    Pthread_mutex_lock(&Mutex1);
    iGlobal1 = iGlobal1 + 1;    
    Pthread_mutex_unlock(&Mutex1);

Thread2:

 Pthread_mutex_lock(&Mutex2);
 iGlobal2 = iGlobal2 + 1;    
 Pthread_mutex_unlock(&Mutex2);

Thread3:

 Pthread_mutex_lock(&Mutex3);
 iGlobal3 = iGlobal3 + 1;    
 Pthread_mutex_unlock(&Mutex3);

Thread4:

while(1)
{
    Pthread_mutex_lock(&Mutex1);
    ilocal1 = iGlobal1;
    Pthread_mutex_unlock(&Mutex1);

    Pthread_mutex_lock(&Mutex2);
    ilocal2 = iGlobal2;
    Pthread_mutex_unlock(&Mutex2);

    Pthread_mutex_lock(&Mutex3);
    ilocal3 = iGlobal3;
    Pthread_mutex_unlock(&Mutex3);

    DoSomething(ilocal1,ilocal2,ilocal3);
}//while 

In my opinion Thread4 can be more efficient, because if thread4 execute too frequently, it costs a lot of cpu, and mutex_lock effect thread1, thread2 and thread3... so I think using pthread_cond_signal will make it better, like following:

Thread1:

 Pthread_mutex_lock(&Mutex1);
 iGlobal1 = iGlobal1 + 1 ;    
 pthread_cond_signal(&condxx);
 Pthread_mutex_unlock(&Mutex1);

Thread2:

 Pthread_mutex_lock(&Mutex2);
 iGlobal2 = iGlobal2 + 1 ;   
 pthread_cond_signal(&condxx);
 Pthread_mutex_unlock(&Mutex2);

Thread3:

 Pthread_mutex_lock(&Mutex3);
 iGlobal3 = iGlobal3 + 1 ;    
 pthread_cond_signal(&condxx);
 Pthread_mutex_unlock(&Mutex3);

Thread4:

while(1)
{

    pthread_cond_wait(&condxx, mutexx);

    Pthread_mutex_lock(&Mutex1);
    ilocal1 = iGlobal1;
    Pthread_mutex_unlock(&Mutex1);

    Pthread_mutex_lock(&Mutex2);
    ilocal2 = iGlobal2;
    Pthread_mutex_unlock(&Mutex2);

    Pthread_mutex_lock(&Mutex3);
    ilocal3 = iGlobal3;
    Pthread_mutex_unlock(&Mutex3);

    DoSomething(ilocal1,ilocal2,ilocal3);
}//while 

Because pthread_cond_signal won't queue signal, so it has no harm in thread1, thread2, thread3 to fire pthread_cond_signal each time receive socket data, and thread4 will be blocked in pthread_cond_wait(&condxx, mutexx) until get pthread_cond_signal, that will save cpu time and also won't effect thread1, thread2, thread3 because less mutex_lock used!

My idea is, using pthread_cond_wait acting like usleep, but while data arrived, thread4 won't miss!

May I ask, What I do has any side effect? Any advice is welcome

share|improve this question
    
Does DoSomething() in thread4 require all 3 threads to have changed their respective global or just one? Does thread4 change the globals in any way? Are the globals anything more than an builtin type and relatively small? Another words, if DoSomething() is just updating a GUI counter or some such operation you might be able to dispense with the locks all together and just have threads1,2,3 write to a pipe. Thread 4 hangs on the pipe read and does its thing. –  Duck Dec 2 '11 at 16:10
    
Thank you,Duck , Once one of Thread1,thread2,threa3 chnaged ,it need to call DoSomething , DoSomething won't change globals , but Dosomething needs complex calculating ,cost times to finish , I think pipe is a good idea , thanks for great advice !! –  barfatchen Dec 5 '11 at 0:17
    
In a second thought , during Dosomethin executing , at the same time Thread1 has 3 data received , thread2 has 5 data received , thread3 has 1 data received , I only like to use only the 3'rd data of thread1 , 5'th data of thread2 , 1'st data in thread3 , all together to fill in DoSomething , using pipe is not a good idea in my case ! –  barfatchen Dec 5 '11 at 0:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think your approach to making thread 4 more efficient is a good one. If there were only thread 1 (the producer) and thread 4 (the consumer), your approach is the standard way to have thread 4 efficiently wait for data to be made available by thread 1. The wrinkle here is the presence of multiple producer threads (threads 2 and 3).

The man page for pthread_cond_signal() says that signaling a condition on which no thread is waiting shall have no effect, so in the case where threads 1, 2, and 3 simultaneously signal condxx (like on a multiprocessor system), the kernel will have one of those calls to pthread_cond_signal() actually unblock thread 4, while the other two will have no effect.

In other words, I think your approach will work. And it is always better to have waiting for data managed by the kernel (pthread_cond_wait(), select(), etc.) than to poll for it in a loop (your usleep() idea).

That being said, there are some critical pieces of your code missing in your example. The mutexx needs to be locked before calling pthread_cond_wait(), and it must be locked and unlocked around the calls to pthread_cond_signal(). This web page has an example that is very similar to your use case, and demonstrates proper locking techniques.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you !! you help a lot !! –  barfatchen Dec 4 '11 at 23:59
    
No problem. I'm glad to help. BTW, on Stack Overflow, a great way to express gratitude is to vote up and/or accept answers that you like. –  Randall Cook Dec 5 '11 at 5:45
    
I don't know why , I clicked "votes" but nothing happened , this really bother me ...I'll spend time to figure it out !! –  barfatchen Dec 5 '11 at 8:25
    
Oh...Vote up need 15 reputation...I've only half , but now I know how to accept answer , thanks !! –  barfatchen Dec 5 '11 at 8:42

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