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I'm trying to test with JUnit4 a method throwing an exception. Here is the code snippet :

package unit_tests;

import org.junit.Test;
import calculator.*;

@Test(expected=CalcError.class)
public void testDivision() {
    Calculator myCalc = new Calculator(10, 0);
    myCalc.setOperation(Calculator.Operation_e.DIVIDE);
    myCalc.getResult();
}

The problem is with the line @Test(expected=CalcError.class): I get the following error :

Class<CalcError> cannot be resolved to a type

Here is how CalcError is defined :

package calculator;

public class Calculator {
    public class CalcError extends Exception {
        // ...
    }

    public double getResult() throws CalcError {
        // ...
    }
}

I don't understand why CalcError is not a type, even though the unit tests are in a unit_tests package and the calculator is in a calculator package.

What am I missing ?

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Could you modify your code so it can be compiled? 1. getResult throws ErreurCalcul but you expecting CalcError 2. testDivision does not have throws clause in its signature but you are expecting to catch CalcError that is checked exception –  mijer Dec 2 '11 at 7:51
    
@mijer ErreurCalcul is the french for CalcError, I think that Jerôme was translating on the fly... –  Matthew Farwell Dec 2 '11 at 7:53
    
@mijer : fixed the error. Matthew was right, I translated on the fly and missed this one ! –  Jérôme Dec 2 '11 at 8:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

CalcError is an inner class, so you need to use

@Test(expected=Calculator.CalcError.class)

See Nested Classes.

EDIT: You will need to declare the test method as throwing Calculator.CalcError as well:

@Test(expected=Calculator.CalcError.class)
public void testDivision() throws Calculator.CalcError {
    Calculator myCalc = new Calculator(10, 0);
    myCalc.setOperation(Calculator.Operation_e.DIVIDE);
    myCalc.getResult();
}

This is to please the compiler, because Calculator.CalcError is an checked Exception.

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I thought about that and tried it, but then, I still get an error in the test for the line myCalc.getResult(); : Unhandled exception type Calculator.CalcError –  Jérôme Dec 2 '11 at 8:07
    
Added throws Calculator.CalcError on the test method –  Matthew Farwell Dec 2 '11 at 9:11

CalcError is an inner class of Calculator. It is not imported by import calculator.*; You'd have to add import calculator.Calculator.CalcError or qualify CalcError (expected=Calculator.CalcError.class).

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Having public classes as inner classes is not a good idea. You should move that to its own file. Only private classes should be nested. You could probably access the Error class by using Calculator.CalcError.class but I'd strong advise against it.

Apart from that I think JUnit lacks a bit of exception detection capabilities as you cannot set a message. I unit test for exceptions by catching them and then calling Assert.fail after the method call that should throw an exception:

try {
    someMethod();
    Assert.fail("SomeException should have been thrown");
catch(SomeException se) {
}
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Since CalcError is an inner class to Calculator you need to reference it like this

@Test(expected=Calculator.CalcError.class)
public void testDivision() {
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As this is a checked exception, you need to add throws Exception to the method signature, otherwise the compiler will complain about the exception.

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