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What’s the return type of an anonymous class

I'm creating an anonymous type with query like the following:

Caller code:

 var query= from p in _db.ExecuteDataSet(SQL).Tables[0].AsEnumerable()
                        select new {
                                       ProductCode = p.Field<string>("PRODUCT_CODE"),
                                       ProductName = p.Field<string>("PRODUCT_NAME")
                                   };
 foreach(var product in query)
 {
     WriteProduct(product);
 }

Method is like:

void WriteProduct(object prod)
{
  //   access the product
}

I fail to get the correct Parameter Type for the WriteProduct method. Please help me.

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Donal Fellows, Ashwini Chaudhary, t0mm13b, bmargulies Jan 19 '13 at 23:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Anonymous types are pretty much what they're called: they don't have a name. And if it doesn't have a name, you can't refer to it. Make it a full-fledged class or struct if you want to be able to refer to it. –  zneak Dec 2 '11 at 7:57
    
@zneak: Anonymous types do have a type name that is known at compile time. You can get it like this: product.GetType().FullName. That doesn't help the OP, but your comment isn't strictly true. –  Eric J. Dec 2 '11 at 8:21
    
@Eric J. I stand corrected. –  zneak Dec 2 '11 at 22:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Yes you can.

public class Program
{
    private static void Thing(dynamic other)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(other.TheThing);
    }

    private static void Main()
    {
        var things = new { TheThing = "Worked!" };
        Thing(things);
    }
}

But as a small, minor detail, DON'T!

Anonymous types are anonymous for a reason, they aren't first class entities in your code, they're more of a convenience. If a type is that important, define it as such.

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There are 3 ways to talk to an anonymous type:

  • reflection (obtain the properties via obj.GetType().GetProperties() / prop.GetValue(obj, null), etc)
  • dynamic (i.e. obj.ProductCode and obj.ProductType, for dynamic obj) - an optimized and prettier version of the above
  • cast-by-example : DO NOT USE

Your WriteProduct must use one of those; or alternatively : use something other than an anonymous type; a Tuple<...>, maybe (although that tends to make it hard to know what the data is) - or an appropriately defined custom interface, class or struct.

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1  
"cast-by-example"? (I won't use it I promise!) –  George Duckett Dec 2 '11 at 8:08
    
@GeorgeDuckett there are some nasty ways you can abuse the (guaranteed within a module) fact that two anon types with the same names and same types in the same order will be the same type. For example, you can create a twin value inside the method, and use that to trick generic type inference into typing the unknown value into that type. Messy and really really brittle. pastie.org/2953799 –  Marc Gravell Dec 2 '11 at 8:22
    
Ahh, clever stuff. I'll definitely not be using that; looks really like some really smelly code! –  George Duckett Dec 2 '11 at 8:30

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think you should create a temporary class to store the product.

select new TempProduct {
    productCode = p.Field<string>("PRODUCT_CODE"),
    productName = p.Field<string>("PRODUCT_NAME")
};

With e.g a class like this

public class TempProduct
{
    public String productCode { get; set; }
    public String productName { get; set; }
}
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+1; I'd make the names have initial caps, even though this is a class with limited usage. ProductCode instead of productCode. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Dec 2 '11 at 8:26
    
Yeah, I had it like that in the beginning, but the coloring might confuse someone since it's colored like a class. But I'm with you here! –  Niklas Dec 2 '11 at 8:39

This isn't exactly what you are asking for, but your select has only two properties, so how about passing these two to the method?

foreach(var product in query) 
{ 
    WriteProduct(product.ProductCode, product.ProductName); 
} 
// ...
void WriteProduct(string productCode, string productName) 
{ 
    // ...
}
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