Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Today,when I was reading the MSDN,I encountered the following codes:

void draw( int I, long L );
long sq( int s );
int main()
{
long y;
int x;

y = sq( x );
draw( x, y );
return();
}

long sq( int s )
{
return( s * s );
}

void draw( int I, long L )
{
/* Statements defining the draw function here */
return;
}

Of course,it didn't work,so I change the

return();

in main function to

return 0;

It works with a caution . I have two problems about this code:

1.Why does Microsoft use return ();Is this just a mistake?Or other reasons?

2.what does return; in the draw function mean?I think it is not necessary,why does it exsit in the function?

share|improve this question
1  
Please tell us which page on MSDN you were reading so we can look too. –  Greg Hewgill Dec 2 '11 at 9:23
    
Can you provide a link to the MSDN article? –  Naveen Dec 2 '11 at 9:24
    
    
Haha, isn't MSDN kind of famous for not fixing the errors but always "fixing" the URLs? :-) –  Prof. Falken Dec 2 '11 at 12:42
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I agree with the other posters, also even though the return in the draw function isn't necessary in this case, as there's an implicit return statement at the end of the function, it is allowable and indeed may be used to exit a function early so that further code in a function is avoided e.g.

void DoSomeWork(bool someCondition)
{
  if(somecondition == true)
  {
    return;
  }
// run lots of code 
}
share|improve this answer
    
In your example ,return works like the break in the loop.do you mean that? –  coqer Dec 2 '11 at 9:39
1  
Yes - except that in this case it exits the whole function, whereas a break in a loop would just exit the loop and then continue with the rest of the function code. –  ChrisBD Dec 2 '11 at 9:49
    
Thank you very much.I am not good at English ,so I can't express my meaning precisely.Actually,my problem is just your example ,the code in my question can't help me to resolve my problem . –  coqer Dec 2 '11 at 9:54
add comment
  • 1 Yes, I believe it's a mistake.
  • 2 In a void returning method, omitting the return statement is equivalent to having a return as the last line of the method.
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - I agree beat me to it. –  ChrisBD Dec 2 '11 at 9:31
    
Thank you very much –  coqer Dec 2 '11 at 9:54
add comment

Obviously I can't say what the author of the code meant, but for the first question I would think it's a mistake and that the author meant to write return(0);.

For the second question you think right. The return is not needed, and again it's impossible to answer why the author put it there.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - I agree beat me to it. –  ChrisBD Dec 2 '11 at 9:31
    
Thank you very much –  coqer Dec 2 '11 at 9:54
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.