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Given a list of opponent seeds (for example seeds 1 to 16), I'm trying to write an algorithm that will result in the top seed playing the lowest seed in that round, the 2nd seed playing the 2nd-lowest seed, etc.

Grouping 1 and 16, 2 and 15, etc. into "matches" is fairly easy, but I also need to make sure that the higher seed will play the lower seed in subsequent rounds.

An example bracket with the correct placement:

1 vs 16
            1 vs 8
8 vs 9
                        1 vs 4
4 vs 13
            4 vs 5
5 vs 12
                                    1 vs 2
2 vs 15
            2 vs 7
7 vs 10
                        2 vs 3
3 vs 14
            3 vs 6
6 vs 11

As you can see, seed 1 and 2 only meet up in the final.

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2  
This is just a suggestion that I haven't thought through at all: work backwards from the final. –  AakashM Dec 2 '11 at 11:21
    
This is basically a gray code (if you use zero-indexing). To translate the standard (binary reflected) gray code into your numbering system, simply reverse the bits and add one. –  Nabb Dec 2 '11 at 16:32
    
@Nabb – I found this which looks interesting, but I'm having trouble understanding the code (it's Ruby which I know nothing about) –  darkangel Dec 2 '11 at 20:14
    
@darkangel: A gray code is code when the hamming distance to the next codeword is 1 and unlike binary code it differ only in 1 bit. Here is an explanation: dba.stackexchange.com/questions/7887/… –  Phpdna Dec 5 '11 at 12:45

5 Answers 5

With your assumptions, players 1 and 2 will play in the final, players 1-4 in the semifinals, players 1-8 in the quarterfinals and so on, so you can build the tournament recursively backwards from the final as AakashM proposed. Think of the tournament as a tree whose root is the final.

In the root node, your players are {1, 2}.

To expand the tree recursively to the next level, take all the nodes on the bottom layer in the tree, one by one, and create two children for them each, and place one of the players of the original node to each one of the child nodes created. Then add the next layer of players and map them to the game so that the worst newly added player plays against the best pre-existing player and so on.

Here first rounds of the algorithm:

 {1,2}  --- create next layer

       {1, _}
      /         --- now fill the empty slots
 {1,2}
      \{2, _}

       {1, 4}   --- the slots filled in reverse order
      /         
 {1,2}
      \{2, 3}   --- create next layer again


             /{1, _}
       {1, 4}
      /      \{4, _}
 {1,2}                  --- again fill
      \      /{2, _}
       {2, 3}
             \{3, _}

             /{1, 8}
       {1, 4}
      /      \{4, 5}    --- ... and so on
 {1,2}
      \      /{2, 7}
       {2, 3}
             \{3, 6}

As you can see, it produces the same tree you posted.

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Very interesting idea, although I would have to think about how to translate it into code. –  darkangel Dec 2 '11 at 14:17
1  
I had this thought as well as another on how to do it without going backwards. I think they ultimately boil down to the same thing though really. Certainly the way to just calculate a position for each player from their seeding is really quite complicated, probably more so for translating into code than this. I'd certainly go with this method. –  Chris Dec 2 '11 at 14:25

This JavaScript returns an array where each even index plays the next odd index

function seeding(numPlayers){
  var rounds = Math.log(numPlayers)/Math.log(2)-1;
  var pls = [1,2];
  for(var i=0;i<rounds;i++){
    pls = nextLayer(pls);
  }
  return pls;
  function nextLayer(pls){
    var out=[];
    var length = pls.length*2+1;
    pls.forEach(function(d){
      out.push(d);
      out.push(length-d);
    });
    return out;
  }
}

> seeding(2)
[1, 2]
> seeding(4)
[1, 4, 2, 3]
> seeding(8)
[1, 8, 4, 5, 2, 7, 3, 6]
> seeding(16)
[1, 16, 8, 9, 4, 13, 5, 12, 2, 15, 7, 10, 3, 14, 6, 11]
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I've come up with the following algorithm. It may not be super-efficient, but I don't think that it really needs to be. It's written in PHP.

<?php
    $players = range(1, 32);
    $count = count($players);

    // Order players.
    for ($i = 0; $i < log($count / 2, 2); $i++) {
        $out = array();

        foreach ($players as $player) {
            $splice = pow(2, $i);

            $out = array_merge($out, array_splice($players, 0, $splice));

            $out = array_merge($out, array_splice($players, -$splice));
        }

        $players = $out;
    }

    // Print match list.
    for ($i = 0; $i < $count; $i++) {
        printf('%s vs %s<br />%s', $players[$i], $players[++$i], PHP_EOL);
    }
?>
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I have a small question about this. How does this work towards feeding the following rounds? –  Paul Williams Mar 1 '12 at 1:03
    
I'm not quite sure what you mean – this just ensures that the highest seed will play the lowest seed in each round (and the 2nd-highest will play the 2nd-lowest, etc.) –  darkangel Mar 3 '12 at 7:56
# Here's one in python - it uses nested list comprehension to be succinct:

from math import log, ceil

def seed( n ):
    """ returns list of n in standard tournament seed order

    Note that n need not be a power of 2 - 'byes' are returned as zero
    """

    ol = [1]

    for i in range( ceil( log(n) / log(2) ) ):

        l = 2*len(ol) + 1

        ol = [e if e <= n else 0 for s in [[el, l-el] for el in ol] for e in s]

    return ol
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  • At each round sort teams by seeding criteria
  • (If there are n teams in a round)team at ith position plays with team n-i+1
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I need to place the teams in the first round so that the top seeds advancing to the next round will automatically be matched up top-seed vs bottom-seed, etc. You can assume that the top seed always wins the match, for the purposes of the algorithm. –  darkangel Dec 2 '11 at 11:12

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