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I am new to CoffeeScript (and rather inexperienced with JS too; so sorry if this is naive) and I was trying to create a class as below:

class Test
   a: []

   make: ->
       @a.push ['A', 'B', 'C']

   getdata: ->
       output = ""
       for i in @a
          output += i
       output

b = new Test
b.make()

alert(b.getdata())


c = new Test
c.make()

alert(c.getdata())

The output I get is: "A, B, C" "A, B, C, A, B, C"

Despite create a new instance of 'Test'; the array gets appended over and is not cleared. What am I doing wrong here? Am I initializing the member variable wrong?

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3  
You should look at how prototypes works, and look at the javascript generated code. I see a lot of this mistake in coffeescript (even in tutorials/cookbooks). The rule I use is to define only functions and static properies in class members (I define instance properties in the constructor with the @member syntax). And Yes it's kinda confusing given the keyword class coffeescript use. –  Guillaume86 Dec 2 '11 at 11:22
3  
side note: getdata: -> @a.join('') –  tokland Dec 2 '11 at 13:11
    
Thanks Guillaume86 and tokland. I learnt a lot from this. –  Anoop Dec 3 '11 at 3:27
    
Related to that subject: TypeScript implements instance members in a more sensible way than coffeescript IMO, you can try it here: typescriptlang.org/Playground –  Guillaume86 Oct 2 '12 at 12:13
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1 Answer

up vote 18 down vote accepted

When you define a: [], you're creating a single array object on the class prototype. Each instance of the class that you create will have this same array object. Whenever one instance modifies the value, the change is visible to all the others.

Note that this is only the case if you modify a value, such as by adding items to an array. If you replace the value, for example by assigning a new array, this will only affect the current instance.

When you want a property that's initialized on a per-instance basis you should to define it in the constructor, when the instance is actually created:

class Test
   constructor: ->
       @a = []
       @a.push ['A', 'B', 'C']

   getdata: ->
       output = ""
       for i in @a
          output += i
       output

b = new Test

alert(b.getdata())


c = new Test

alert(c.getdata())

Try this out and you'll find that it works like you want.

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No wonder people get confused when you see things like that: coffeescriptcookbook.com/chapters/classes_and_objects/chaining –  Guillaume86 Dec 2 '11 at 11:28
    
Thanks! Now I understand. What had confused me even more was the modify/replace difference in behaviour. Now that is cleared too. Thanks for the help. –  Anoop Dec 3 '11 at 3:29
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