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I have three concurrent routines like this,

func Routine1() {

Print (value a, value b, value c)
Print (value a, value b, value c)
Print (value a, value b, value c)

}

func Routine2() {
Print (value e, value f, value g)
Print (value e, value f, value g)
Print (value e, value f, value g)
}
func Routine3() {
Print (value x, value y, value z)
Print (value x, value y, value z)
Print (value x, value y, value z)
}

func main() {
go Routine1(command12, response12, command13, response13)
go Routine2(command12, response12, command23, response23)
Routine3(command13, response13, command23, response23)
}

Now what problem I am facing is, sometimes it will happen that, as the result of three concurrent routines, sometimes the print statement is not executing properly means not printing whole, there is some thing inserted by another print. For example, Print (value a, value b, value c) of routine 1 gives output like value a, value b, value g where value g is inserted by routine 2. Can anybody suggest me, how can I stop it ? I have tried sync-mutex procedure. However may be as my code is too long and may be I can not put lock-unlock in a right way, so it is giving a deadlock error. Can anybody suggest me how can I implement those in a simple way or in a less risky sync-mutex procedure.

More info about this problem of mine can be found here.

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I think Go language has very poor mutex implementation. It don't work properly like Java. –  alessandro Dec 2 '11 at 11:47
    
@alessandro: Why do you think so? OP has kindly not even bothered to show how the Print function is defined and there is no other usage of a mutex seen anywhere around. –  zzzz Dec 2 '11 at 14:52
1  
@jnml, in this case you solve the problem in a native way. But, if there is some file writing and also printing function happens, then how can you handle ? As per I can remember Arpssss in his previous question given structure like that. As I am a Java user, I am sure in Java, you have not to apply this kind of tricks. –  alessandro Dec 2 '11 at 15:04
    
@alessandro: You don't have to apply such tricks in Go either. Anything which must be serialized, as opposed to allowably intermixed, on some given/defined boundaries, is in Go easy done by channels w/o any explicit synchronization requirements. And that note about Go's poor mutex implementation is only trolling, it has nothing to do with reality nor with OP's problem. –  zzzz Dec 2 '11 at 15:49
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Printing as you describe it is not an atomic operation. Instead of using mutexes, try the Go way. Pass a channel into each goroutine which accepts a string. Every time you want to print something, just send the string into that channel.

A separate goroutine does nothing more than read from that channel and prints whatever comes out. This way there is no need for locks.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sync"
)

func main() {
    var wg sync.WaitGroup
    wg.Add(2) // 2 routines we need to wait for.

    stdout := make(chan string)

    go routine1(&wg, stdout)
    go routine2(&wg, stdout)
    go printfunc(stdout)

    wg.Wait()

    close(stdout)
}

func routine1(wg *sync.WaitGroup, stdout chan<- string) {
    defer wg.Done()

    stdout <- "first print from 1"
    // do stuff
    stdout <- "second print from 1"
}

func routine2(wg *sync.WaitGroup, stdout chan<- string) {
    defer wg.Done()

    stdout <- "first print from 2"
    // do stuff
    stdout <- "second print from 2"
}

func printfunc(stdout <-chan string) {
    for {
        select {
        case str := <- stdout:
            fmt.Println(str)
        }
    }
}
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Thanks. It's really nice procedure. Let me try. –  Arpssss Dec 2 '11 at 14:54
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