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How to get rid of deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’ warnings in GCC?

This assignment:

char *pc1 = "test string";

gives me this warning:

warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to 'char*'

while this one seems to be fine:

char *pc2 = (char*)("test string");

Is this one a really better way to proceed?

Notes: for other reasons I cannot use a const char*.

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marked as duplicate by MSalters, sidyll, Paul R, David Heffernan, ChrisF Dec 2 '11 at 12:51

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3  
Don't use a C++ compiler for C code. –  pmg Dec 2 '11 at 12:19
3  
You really should be using a const char * for this... –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 2 '11 at 12:20
2  
What are those other reasons? –  Marcelo Cantos Dec 2 '11 at 12:24
    
Which compiler? gcc-4.5.1 doesn't say a word. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 2 '11 at 12:27
1  
casting away the warning is really a bad idea. Just use char const*pc1 and everything should be fine. –  Jens Gustedt Dec 2 '11 at 12:41

3 Answers 3

A string literal is a const char[] in C++, and may be stored in read-only memory so your program will crash if you try to modify it. Pointing a non-const pointer at it is a bad idea.

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1  
Whether or not it is stored in read-only memory, it's UB to modify it. End of story. –  David Heffernan Dec 2 '11 at 14:12

That depends on whether you need to modify the string literal or not. If yes,

char pc1[] = "test string";
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1  
That doesn't let you modify the literal, it let's you modify a copy –  David Heffernan Dec 2 '11 at 13:10
    
Correct. Your comment is precise. –  Mahesh Dec 2 '11 at 13:38

In your second example, you must make sure that you don't attempt to modify the the string pointed to by pc2.

If you do need to modify the string, there are several alternatives:

  1. Make a dynamically-allocated copy of the literal (don't forget to free() it when done):

    char *pc3 = strdup("test string"); /* or malloc() + strcpy() */

  2. Use an array instead of a pointer:

    char pc4[] = "test string";

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1  
+1: Although you should point out that strdup is not standard C... –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 2 '11 at 12:25
    
I used char pc4[] = "test string"; and I get no warnings. I wanted to know if this is the correct way to proceed, or if I am just planting a bug in my code... –  Pietro M Dec 2 '11 at 15:24
    
@PietroM: No, you're not planting any bugs, as long as you bear in mind that the allocated array is strlen("test string")+1 bytes long. If you need a longer array, you can specify the length explicitly: char pc4[32] = "test string"; –  NPE Dec 2 '11 at 15:28
    
To be more precise, I used static char pc4[] = "test string"; and I get no warnings. I did it static because it is inside a function, and I want the string to be available even when out of the function. I wanted to know if this is the correct way to proceed, or if I am just planting a bug in my code... –  Pietro M Dec 2 '11 at 15:33

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