Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We've run into a Java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: PermGen space error and looking at the tomcat JVM params, other than the -Xms and -Xmx params we also specify -XX:MaxPermSize=128m. After a bit of profiling I can see occasionally garbage collection happening on the PermGen space saving it from running full.

My question is: other than increasing the -XX:MaxPermSize what would be the difference if I specify as well -XX:PermSize? I know the total memory then would be Xmx+maxPermSize but is there any other reason why -XX:PermSize should not be there when -XX:MaxPermSize is specified?

Please do share if you have real-world experience dealing with these JVM parameters.

ps. The JVM is HotSpot 64bit Server VM build 16.2-b04

share|improve this question
    
you need to care about the max only, waste of the energy and the entropy b/c of this very question will never come close to saving of "perfectly" tuning the jvm. maxPerGen is important and specify any arbitrary high value, the jvm wont commit before it actually needs. –  bestsss Dec 2 '11 at 15:19

3 Answers 3

-XX:PermSize specifies the initial size that will be allocated during startup of the JVM. If necessary, the JVM will allocate up to -XX:MaxPermSize.

share|improve this answer
1  
true. It also makes the difference that the total memory appears as Xmx+maxPermSize which is very important. That's why I am asking whether there is anything else going on. –  dimitrisli Dec 2 '11 at 13:11
    
The total memory consists of more than mx and maxperm. Especially you get some memory (stack) for each thread. If you have thousands (which is not a good thing) this can be up to 50% of the overall size. There might also be excessive native heap when you have some JNI implementations (for example oder SAP JCO drivers). And some compoennts use the off-heap direct mapped memory in addition. –  eckes Oct 2 '12 at 19:44

By playing with parameters as -XX:PermSize and -Xms you can tune the performance of - for example - the startup of your application. I haven't looked at it recently, but a few years back the default value of -Xms was something like 32MB (I think), if your application required a lot more than that it would trigger a number of cycles of fill memory - full garbage collect - increase memory etc until it had loaded everything it needed. This cycle can be detrimental for startup performance, so immediately assigning the number required could improve startup.

A similar cycle is applied to the permanent generation. So tuning these parameters can improve startup (amongst others).

WARNING The JVM has a lot of optimization and intelligence when it comes to allocating memory, dividing eden space and older generations etc, so don't do things like making -Xms equal to -Xmx or -XX:PermSize equal to -XX:MaxPermSize as it will remove some of the optimizations the JVM can apply to its allocation strategies and therefor reduce your application performance instead of improving it.

As always: make non-trivial measurements to prove your changes actually improve performance overall (for example improving startup time could be disastrous for performance during use of the application)

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks. I'm astound to see how diametrically opposite the views are on this (look at @mijer response) even in various other places. I understand this since we don't really know what this flag is doing and how it is interacting with the other one unless we study the c code of the JVM. That's why I was looking for hands-on real-life experiences. –  dimitrisli Dec 2 '11 at 20:27
    
The "don't do things like making -Xms equal to -Xmx" comment is not shared by all users. Tomcat specifically recommends setting them to the same value. tomcatexpert.com/blog/2011/11/22/… –  John Hinnegan Oct 12 '13 at 5:28
    
@JohnHinnegan Setting it to the same value does have its advantages (such as less garbage collection during startup), but as I said in my answer it will prevent the JVM from making some optimizations. And in that event you will either have to live with it or do those optimizations yourself with the commandline options of the JVM. –  Mark Rotteveel Oct 12 '13 at 9:05

If you're doing some performance tuning it's often recommended to set both -XX:PermSize and -XX:MaxPermSize to the same value to increase JVM efficiency.

Here is some information:

  1. Support for large page heap on x86 and amd64 platforms
  2. Java Support for Large Memory Pages
  3. Setting the Permanent Generation Size

You can also specify -XX:+CMSClassUnloadingEnabled to enable class unloading option if you are using CMS GC. It may help to decrease the probability of Java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: PermGen space

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'm astound to see how diametrically opposite the views are on this (look at @Mark Rotteveel response) even in various other places. I understand this since we don't really know what this flag is doing and how it is interacting with the other one unless we study the c code of the JVM. That's why I was looking for hands-on real-life experiences. –  dimitrisli Dec 2 '11 at 20:26
2  
See also GC Tuning Java 6 Setting -Xms and -Xmx to the same value increases predictability by removing the most important sizing decision from the virtual machine. On the other hand, the virtual machine can't compensate if you make a poor choice. –  Mark Rotteveel Dec 3 '11 at 13:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.