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I have a view that returns users projects and also their windows login. An example of the data is below :-

project   | Login
------------------
project 1 | richab
project 2 | stevej

I need to append the domain to the login. i could put this in the code but i dont want to do that in every view i ever create that pulls users logins.

Can i create a global variable that i can reference in the views code. How can i acheive this? Whats best practice for this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't know if the SQL Server has global variables, but you can use a user defined function as follows:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.fn_GetDomainName()
RETURNS STRING
AS
BEGIN
    RETURN 'domain_name\\'
END

and do a SELECT dbo.fn_GetDomainName() + Login FROM table WHERE ... at the corresponding locations in your views.

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1  
or use a table for global variables instead... –  Matten Dec 2 '11 at 12:48
    
What about performance? Would i see a big drop in calling a function on every row? –  Richard Banks Dec 2 '11 at 12:52
    
It's just returning a static string so the overhead should be pretty limited. –  Asken Dec 2 '11 at 12:53
    
SQL Server doesn't support user defined global variables. The ones like @@rowCount, @@Error, @@Connections which exist are pre-defined global variables by SQL Server engine. We will have to apply such alternate routes as mentioned in the answer such as user defined function if we want to share some common constant value across multiple stored procedures. –  Rasik Bihari Tiwari Nov 27 '14 at 19:10

There's no such thing as a global variable in SQL Server.

You can't just do:

DECLARE @@GlobalVar int

You can fake it with CONTEXT_INFO but to use something that would last beyond a session or restart you need to do something like this:

USE master
IF OBJECT_ID('dbo.sp_GlobalVariables') IS NOT NULL
    DROP TABLE dbo.sp_GlobalVariables
GO
CREATE TABLE dbo.sp_GlobalVariables
(
    varName NVARCHAR(100) COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AI,
    varValue SQL_VARIANT
)
GO

IF OBJECT_ID('dbo.sp_GetGlobalVariableValue') IS NOT NULL
    DROP PROC dbo.sp_GetGlobalVariableValue
GO
CREATE PROC dbo.sp_GetGlobalVariableValue
(
    @varName NVARCHAR(100),
    @varValue SQL_VARIANT = NULL OUTPUT 
)
AS
    SET NOCOUNT ON    
    -- set the output parameter
    SELECT    @varValue = varValue 
    FROM    sp_globalVariables 
    WHERE    varName = @varName

    -- also return it as a resultset
    SELECT    varName, varValue 
    FROM    sp_globalVariables 
    WHERE    varName = @varName
    SET NOCOUNT OFF
GO

IF OBJECT_ID('dbo.sp_SetGlobalVariableValue') IS NOT NULL
    DROP PROC dbo.sp_SetGlobalVariableValue
GO
CREATE PROC dbo.sp_SetGlobalVariableValue
(
    @varName NVARCHAR(100),
    @varValue SQL_VARIANT,
    @result CHAR(1) = NULL OUTPUT 
)
AS
    SET NOCOUNT ON
    UPDATE    dbo.sp_GlobalVariables 
    SET        varValue = @varValue
    WHERE    varName = @varName;    
    -- if it doesn't exist yet add it
    IF @@rowcount = 0
    BEGIN 
        INSERT INTO dbo.sp_GlobalVariables(varName, varValue)
        SELECT @varName, @varValue
        -- return it as inserted        
        SELECT @result = 'I'
    END 
    -- return it as updated
    SELECT @result = 'U'
    SET NOCOUNT OFF
GO

DECLARE @dt DATETIME
SELECT @dt = GETDATE()
EXEC sp_SetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalDate', @dt;
EXEC sp_SetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalInt', 5;
EXEC sp_SetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalVarchar', 'This is a very good global variable'
EXEC sp_SetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalBinary', 0x0012314;

GO

EXEC sp_GetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalDate' 
EXEC sp_GetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalInt'
EXEC sp_GetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalVarchar'
EXEC sp_GetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalBinary'

GO
-- update value in master
EXEC sp_SetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalVarchar', 'New varchar value'

USE AdventureWorks

EXEC sp_GetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalDate' 
EXEC sp_GetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalInt'
EXEC sp_GetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalVarchar'
EXEC sp_GetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalBinary'

-- update value in AdventureWorks
EXEC sp_SetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalInt', 6

EXEC sp_GetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalDate' 
EXEC sp_GetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalInt'
EXEC sp_GetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalVarchar'
EXEC sp_GetGlobalVariableValue 'GlobalBinary'
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You can use a temp table. My scenario is that when data is updated via a known process, it adds a note to the audit table stating that 'this was done on purpose'.

When that proc fires, it inserts a single value into #auditnote (which is a temp table I create on the fly).

The trigger checks for that table. If it exists, it pulls off the note and puts it on the audit table.

If it doesn't, then it goes about it's business.

I looked at using an @@ variable, but the trick there is determining if the variable exists. I don't see a way.

EXAMPLE: Stored Procedure:

SELECT 'Alrighty Then' AS NOTE INTO #AuditNote

Trigger:

    DECLARE @noteExists BIT
    DECLARE @note NVARCHAR(500)
    IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#auditnote') IS NOT NULL
    BEGIN
        SELECT 
            TOP (1)
            @noteExists = 1,
            @note = Note
        FROM 
            #auditNote
    END ELSE BEGIN
        SELECT @noteExists = 0
    END

-- do something with the note

    IF @noteExists = 1
    BEGIN
        DROP TABLE #AuditNotes
    END

I'm using @noteExists rather than a null check because someone could insert a null as the note, so we don't know if null means TABLE DOESN'T EXIST or NOTE IS NULL.

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