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I'm trying to optimize this function using SIMD but I don't know where to start.

long sum(int x,int y)
{
    return x*x*x+y*y*y;
}

The disassembled function looks like this:

  4007a0:   48 89 f2                mov    %rsi,%rdx
  4007a3:   48 89 f8                mov    %rdi,%rax
  4007a6:   48 0f af d6             imul   %rsi,%rdx
  4007aa:   48 0f af c7             imul   %rdi,%rax
  4007ae:   48 0f af d6             imul   %rsi,%rdx
  4007b2:   48 0f af c7             imul   %rdi,%rax
  4007b6:   48 8d 04 02             lea    (%rdx,%rax,1),%rax
  4007ba:   c3                      retq   
  4007bb:   0f 1f 44 00 00          nopl   0x0(%rax,%rax,1)

The calling code looks like this:

 do {
for (i = 0; i < maxi; i++) {
  j = nextj[i];
  long sum = cubeSum(i,j);
  while (sum <= p) {
    long x = sum & (psize - 1);
    int flag = table[x];
    if (flag <= guard) {
      table[x] = guard+1;
    } else if (flag == guard+1) {
      table[x] = guard+2;
      count++;
    }
    j++;
    sum = cubeSum(i,j);
  }
  nextj[i] = j;
}
p += psize;
guard += 3;
} while (p <= n);
share|improve this question
3  
SSE probably isn't going to help with this very much, unless you actually have arrays of x and y values ? You probably need to show the code that actually calls the sum() function. – Paul R Dec 2 '11 at 13:44
1  
If you don't know where to start, you won't be able to optimize anything better than the compiler. And here, there's nothing to optimize, how do you expect to do better than 4 multiplications? – Kevin Dec 2 '11 at 13:44
1  
SSE is for SIMD, you just have SISD! – David Heffernan Dec 2 '11 at 13:57
2  
Did you profile your app to prove that cubeSum is the bottleneck? Seems unlikely. – David Heffernan Dec 2 '11 at 14:13
1  
In the inner loop, instead of recalculating the sum after you increment j, you may just update the sum according to the formula newSum = (j + 1)^3 = j^3 + 3*j^2 + 3*j + 1 = oldSum + 3*j^2 + 3*j + 1 – Marat Dukhan Dec 3 '11 at 1:47
up vote 6 down vote accepted
  • Fill one SSE register with (x|y|0|0) (since each SSE register holds 4 32-bit elements). Lets call it r1
  • then make a copy of that register to another register r2
  • Do r2 * r1, storing the result in, say r2.
  • Do r2 * r1 again storing the result in r2
  • Now in r2 you have (x*x*x|y*y*y|0|0)
  • Unpack the lower two elements of r2 into separate registers, add them (SSE3 has horizontal add instructions, but only for floats and doubles).

In the end, I'd actually be surprised if this turned out to be any faster than the simple code the compiler has already generated for you. SIMD is more useful if you have arrays of data you want to operate on..

share|improve this answer
    
I have never programmed with simd optimalization where can i find the description for this commands ? can i do it using emmintrin.h? how ? – sherif Dec 2 '11 at 14:06
    
@sherif: Just google for some SSE tutorial; there's plenty of them. And yes, {x,e,p}mmintrin.h contain the intrinsics, which are easier to use than raw inline asm. – janneb Dec 2 '11 at 14:21

This particular case is not a good fit for SIMD (SSE or otherwise). SIMD really only works well when you have contiguous arrays that you can access sequentially and process heterogeneously.

However you can at least get rid of some of the redundant operations in the scalar code, e.g. repeatedly calculating i * i * i when i is invariant:

do {
    for (i = 0; i < maxi; i++) {
        int i3 = i * i * i;
        int j = nextj[i];
        int j3 = j * j * j;
        long sum = i3 + j3;
        while (sum <= p) {
            long x = sum & (psize - 1);
            int flag = table[x];
            if (flag <= guard) {
              table[x] = guard+1;
            } else if (flag == guard+1) {
              table[x] = guard+2;
              count++;
            }
            j++;
            j3 = j * j * j;
            sum = i3 + j3;
        }
        nextj[i] = j;
    }
    p += psize;
    guard += 3;
} while (p <= n);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for you reply the performance has not changed I think the compiler does it automatically. – sherif Dec 2 '11 at 14:49
    
Could be - you should profile your code and see where the performance bottlenecks really are – Paul R Dec 2 '11 at 14:51

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