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#include <iostream>

struct a
{
  enum LOCAL_A
  {
    A1,
    A2
  };
};
enum class b
{
    B1,
    B2
};

int foo( int input )
{
    return input;
}

int main(void)
{
    std::cout<<foo(a::A1)<<std::endl;
    std::cout<<foo(static_cast<int>(b::B2))<<std::endl;
}

The a::LOCAL_A is what the strongly typed enum is trying to achieve, but there is a small difference : normal enums can be converted into integer type, while strongly typed enums can not do it without a cast.

So, is there a way to convert a strongly typed enum value into an integer type without a cast? If yes, how?

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I just learnt about stronly-typed enums for the first time! –  aakashbhowmick Aug 26 at 10:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Strongly typed enums aiming to solve multiple problems and not only scoping problem as you mentioned in your question:

  1. Provide type safety, thus eliminating implicit conversion to integer by integral promotion.
  2. Specify underlying types.
  3. Provide strong scoping.

Thus, it is impossible to implicitly convert a strongly typed enum to integers, or even its underlying type - that's the idea. So you have to use static_cast to make conversion explicit.

If your only problem is scoping and you really want to have implicit promotion to integers, then you better off using not strongly typed enum with the scope of the structure it is declared in.

Hope it helps!

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As others have said, you can't have an implicit conversion, and that's by-design.

If you want you can avoid the need to specify the underlying type in the cast.

template <typename E>
typename std::underlying_type<E>::type to_underlying(E e) {
    return static_cast<typename std::underlying_type<E>::type>(e);
}

std::cout << foo(to_underlying(b::B2)) << std::endl;
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Hope this helps you or someone else

enum class EnumClass : int //set size for enum
{
    Zero, One, Two, Three, Four
};

union Union //This will allow us to convert
{
    EnumClass ec;
    int i;
};

int main()
{
using namespace std;

//convert from strongly typed enum to int

Union un2;
un2.ec = EnumClass::Three;

cout << "un2.i = " << un2.i << endl;

//convert from int to strongly typed enum
Union un;
un.i = 0; 

if(un.ec == EnumClass::Zero) cout << "True" << endl;

return 0;
}
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5  
This is called "type punning" and although supported by some compilers is not portable, as the C++ standard says that after you set un.i that is the "active member" and you can only read the active member of a union. –  Jonathan Wakely May 2 at 12:49

No. There is no natural way.

In fact, one of the motivations behind having strongly typed enum class in C++11 is to prevent their silent conversion to int.

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#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdint>

#include <type_traits>

namespace utils
{

namespace details
{

template< typename E >
using enable_enum_t = typename std::enable_if< std::is_enum<E>::value, 
                                               typename std::underlying_type<E>::type 
                                             >::type;

}   // namespace details


template< typename E >
constexpr inline details::enable_enum_t<E> underlying_value( E e )noexcept
{
    return static_cast< typename std::underlying_type<E>::type >( e );
}   


template< typename E , typename T>
constexpr inline typename std::enable_if< std::is_enum<E>::value &&
                                          std::is_integral<T>::value, E
                                         >::type 
 to_enum( T value ) noexcept 
 {
     return static_cast<E>( value );
 }

} // namespace utils




int main()
{
    enum class E{ a = 1, b = 3, c = 5 };

    constexpr auto a = utils::underlying_value(E::a);
    constexpr E    b = utils::to_enum<E>(5);
    constexpr auto bv = utils::underlying_value(b);

    printf("a = %d, b = %d", a,bv);
    return 0;
}
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